Central Composers Alliance Blog - David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/ Founded in 1995, the Central Composers Alliance, whose Patron is Sir Richard Rodney Bennett, was formed to promote the works of members of the Composers Guild of Great Britain who are resident in, or have close connections with, Central England. David Fisher Composers Classical Music David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/images/shops/161.jpg http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/index.cfm?composer=161 David Fisher DAVID FISHER'S CDs - David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=26 <p><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 249 1422 Kingfisher Chorale 11 3 1668 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Lincoln Cathedral Choir</b>:<b> </b><em><b><a href="http://www.prioryrecords.co.uk/item.php?code=PRAB101">Choral Music from Lincoln Cathedral</a></b></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal">[<a href="http://www.prioryrecords.co.uk/item.php?code=PRAB101">Priory PRAB 101</a>, Recorded as an LP in 1982 and rereleased on CD in 2007]. Directed by<b> Philip Marshall</b>. Organ:<b> Roger Bryan</b>. Featuring David Fisher&rsquo;s<b> <i><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=811">Ave Regina caelorum</a></i> </b>[Roberton Publications 85180] with soloists Philip Manser and Richard Thornton [altos] and Terence Millward [tenor].</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Derby Choral Union</b>: <em><b>Sounds Like Christmas</b></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal">[CD: ASC Recordings 1998, ASC CS CD 9]. Conducted by <b>David Fisher</b> with <b><a href="http://www.derwentbrass.co.uk">Derwent Brass</a></b> [conducted by <a href="http://www.derwentbrass.co.uk/musical-director-of-derwent-brass_75_2_57.html">Keith Leonard</a>]. Features David Fisher&rsquo;s arrangements of <b><i>The Angel Gabriel</i></b>, <b><i>There shall a star of David come forth</i></b> and <b><i>Joy to the World</i></b>.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>&nbsp;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Kingfisher Chorale</b>: <em><b>In Dulci Jubilo</b></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal">[CD: ASC Recordings 1999, ASC CS CD 18]. Conducted by <b>David Fisher</b>. Featuring David Fisher&rsquo;s <b><i><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=823">Mary Laid Her Child</a></i></b> [Roberton Publications 85102].</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Derby Choral Union</b>: <strong><a href="http://willtodd.com">Will Todd</a></strong>:&nbsp;<em><strong><a href="http://www.willtodd.com/docs/Catalogue_of_Works_2.pdf">A Song of Creation</a></strong></em></p> <!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 41 239 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 279 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal">[CD: Tyalgum Press 2000]. Conducted by <b>David Fisher</b> with <b><a href="http://www.jennysaunders.com">Jenny Saunders</a> </b>[soprano],<b>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.akemanvoices.org.uk/musicaldirector.htm">Martin Quinn </a></b>[tenor], <b><a href="http://www.leandros.co.uk">Leandros Taliotis</a> </b>[baritone],&nbsp;<strong>Tom Corfield </strong>[organ], <strong><a href="http://www.dcu.org.uk">Derby Choral Union</a></strong>, <strong><a href="http://www.derwentsingers.org.uk">The Derwent Singers</a></strong>, <strong><a href="http://www.kinderchildrenschoirs.org.uk">Kinder Children&acute;s Choir of the High Peak</a></strong> and <strong><a href="http://www.derbyconcertorchestra.co.uk">Derby Concert Orchestra</a></strong>.&nbsp;World premiere recording of Will Todd&acute;s <strong><em>A Song of Creation</em></strong> on April 15th 2000 at <strong>Derby Cathedral</strong>.&nbsp;</p> <!--EndFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Central Composers&acute; Alliance</b>:&nbsp;<em><strong>Music for a While</strong></em><b>&nbsp;(New music by British composers)</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">[CD: ASC Recordings 2001, ASC CS CD44].&nbsp;Featuring David Fisher&rsquo;s&nbsp;<b><i><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=816">The Four Seasons</a> </i></b>and<b><i> <a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=653">Trialogue</a></i></b>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Kingfisher Chorale</b>: <b>Malcolm Arnold</b>:<b> <em>Bright Jewels</em>&nbsp;(Music from the 1940s &amp; 50s)</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">[2CDs: Maestro Sound &amp; Vision 2007, MSV 0214CD]. Conducted by <b>David Fisher</b>. Featuring <a href="http://www.malcolmarnold.co.uk">Malcolm Arnold</a>&rsquo;s <b><i><a href="http://www.malcolmarnold.co.uk/reviews/reviews_bright_jewels.html">The John Clare Cantata</a></i></b> [<a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/Malcolm-Arnold-Clare-Cantata-Op-52/dp/B001ARTQIE">Paterson Publications</a> 1955].</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Derby Cathedral</b>: <b>Angel Voices</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">[CD: Regent Records REG CD 333 2009]. Conducted by <b>Peter Gould </b>with organists <b>Tom Corfield</b> and <b>Ben Bloor</b>. Featuring David Fisher&rsquo;s <b><i><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=817">The Tiffany Anthem</a></i></b> [Self-published].</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Kingfisher Chorale</b>: <b>Follow That Star&hellip;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">[CD: Alan Hames Recordings 2010]. Conducted by <b>David Fisher</b>. Featuring David Fisher&rsquo;s <b><i><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=820">Balulalow</a></i></b> [Oriana Publications] and an arrangement of <a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=1062"><b><i>Stille Nacht</i></b> </a>[Self-published]</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://www.roderjongenskoor.nl/14/cd-s"><b>Roder Jogenskoor</b>: <b>A Babe is born</b></a></p> <p class="MsoNormal">[CD: WestraMedia V.O.F. &amp; Stichting 2011]. Conducted by <b>Rintje te Wies </b>with organist<b> Sietze de Vries</b>. Featuring David Fisher&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=823"><b><i>Mary Laid Her Child</i></b>&nbsp;</a>[Roberton Publications 85102].</p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p> GMT http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=26 David Fisher - David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=30 GMT http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=30 David Fisher GETTYSBURG - a sesquicentennial commemoration - David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=53 <p><strong>In June and July 2013, David Fisher went on holiday to America with his eldest grandson, Sam Russell, and part of the trip through seven States was always to be present at the exact time of the commemoration of Pickett&acute;s Charge at the culmination of the Battle of Gettysburg in the American Civil War at 3 p.m. on July 3rd. This article by Ike Wilson appeared in the Frederick News Post [Maryland] on July 4th 2013:</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="byline" style="font-size: 11px; outline: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px 0px 10px; line-height: 16px; font-weight: bold; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); font-family: arial; text-align: left; ">Posted on July 4, 2013</p> <ul class="post-author-list" style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; clear: left; "> <li class="first-in-list odd list-position-1" style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; list-style: none outside none; "><a href="http://www.fredericknewspost.com/users/profile/Ike%20Wilson" style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px 0px 5px; padding: 0px; color: rgb(8, 71, 141); text-decoration: none; overflow: hidden; display: block; clear: left; float: left; background-position: 0px 50%; "><img class="minitar" alt="Ike Wilson" src="https://fredericknewspost-dot-com.bloxcms-ny1.com/content/tncms/avatars/e/1f/0d2/e1f0d2dc-05de-11e3-96d2-001a4bcf6878.png" style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px 5px 0px 0px; padding: 2px; border: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); width: 25px; float: left; background-position: 0px 50%; " /></a> <p class="post-author" style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px 0px 5px; float: left; ">by&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fredericknewspost.com/users/profile/Ike%20Wilson" style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; color: rgb(8, 71, 141); text-decoration: none; "><em style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; font-style: normal; color: rgb(69, 125, 157); font-weight: bold; ">Ike Wilson</em></a></p> </li> </ul> <p style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px 0px 18px; line-height: 15px; ">&nbsp;</p> <p style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px 0px 18px; line-height: 15px; ">&nbsp;</p> <p style="outline: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px 0px 18px; line-height: 15px; "><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 403 2298 Kingfisher Chorale 19 5 2696 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Whether David Fisher and his wife, Pauline, would attend the Civil War sesquicentennial commemoration was not a question for debate.&nbsp;Fisher, of Leicester, England, said he had to take part &ldquo;in one of the most outstanding demonstrations of unswerving bravery from the Confederate soldiers in the advance known as Pickett&acute;s Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Fisher and his wife, who is an historian and expert on the American Civil War, have visited many historical sites in several American states.&nbsp;&ldquo;Being English, we are most empathetic to the Confederate cause &mdash; not because of the issue of slavery, but because we love the Southern states, where we are always greeted like long-lost relatives, and because the government of Victorian Britain found it necessary to side with the Confederacy because of the cotton and its importance in the economic life of northern England,&rdquo; Fisher said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Re-enactors from England, Australia and Germany booked 17 rooms at Frederick&rsquo;s Red Horse Comfort Inn, said Joe Shelton, a former Frederick resident who portrays Confederate Gen. James Lawson Kemper in the re-enactments.&nbsp;A hotel employee could not confirm the number of rooms taken by Civil War enthusiasts, but said many re-enactors are at the hotel and no rooms are available.Pauline Fisher&acute;s birthday is today and David Fisher&acute;s birthday is Dec. 7 &mdash; the day Pearl Harbor was hit &mdash; &ldquo;so we were destined to love America, and we do,&rdquo; he said.&ldquo;Meeting people like Joe (Shelton) has made America more real. There&rsquo;s a little bit of America in me and my wife now.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Shelton, a Frederick native, and George Wells, of Madison, Va., who portrays Gen. Robert E. Lee, lauded the foreigners&rsquo; Civil War knowledge.&ldquo;We find generally that English and German people know more about American history than many Americans, and that&rsquo;s because they&rsquo;ve studied it, and there&rsquo;s been such a letdown in the teachings in American schools,&rdquo; Wells said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Click <a href="http://www.fredericknewspost.com/arts_and_entertainment/arts_and_entertainment_topics/history/article_64c3078c-95c9-5388-b06f-abdb06bba3b9.html">here</a> for the link to the article in the newspaper. The following link: [<a href="http://video.foxnews.com/v/2525329766001/reenactment-of-picketts-charge-to-commemorate-gettysburg/">click here</a>] takes you directly to the Fox News article on Gettysburg which, alas, does not contain the interview with David.</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>A requested write-up of the event was printed in the opinion columns of the&nbsp;Frederick News Post&acute;s&nbsp;Sunday edition on July 21st. Click <a href="http://www.fredericknewspost.com/arts_and_entertainment/article_7312570c-28c7-5e3a-a3ac-131fede32f04.html">here</a> for the link for this article in the newspaper.</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A chance meeting in the beautiful city of Frederick a few years ago led to one of the greatest experiences of my life and that was at Gettysburg on July 3, 2013.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">It is difficult to equate making that statement, now I&rsquo;m back in England, without considering many of the wonderful things my wife and I have already experienced in the United States of America: the majesty of Death Valley and the Grand Canyon; the peace and beauty of the Outer Banks; the might of Niagara Falls; the spectacular Amicalola Falls in Georgia; the Little White Houses of FDR and Harry S. Truman; wonderful theatrical performances in Cleveland, Ohio and Abbeville S.C.; historic sites from Fort Ticonderoga, N.Y. to Fort George, Fla.; museums of world importance in D.C. and the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art in Winter Park, Fla.; remarkable smaller ones such as the Kermit Museum in Mississippi and the Johnstown Flood Museum in Pennsylvania.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">But even impressive state capitals, the glitz of Las Vegas and the beaches of Miami cannot compete with what we consider the best thing about your great country &mdash; and that is the people.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Everywhere we have ever been in 33 states so far we have met people who have greeted us like long-lost relatives. They&rsquo;ve invited us to their homes, sent presents and greetings throughout the year and welcomed us wherever we have visited.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">The coincidental meeting in Frederick was, therefore, most propitious. It was with Joseph Shelton, who re-enacts the distinguished figure of the Confederate Gen. Kemper who, though injured at Gettysburg, bore a terrible injury with fortitude and became the first governor of Virginia after Reconstruction. Joe himself is also a remarkable man, with a long and proud family history in Frederick. He and his wife Linda were very openhearted at the first meeting and we have remained in close touch ever since.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Joe also introduced us to the general of generals: the esteemed and illustrious Robert E Lee, portrayed with uncanny likeness by the wonderful and generously spirited George Wells of Madison, Va., who at the recent Gettysburg 150 led the troops and followers up the field. He was greeted as a hero by the thousands of spectators who had braved the morning rain and the searing heat of the afternoon of the 3rd of July in order to witness this historic occasion.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Why was I so moved? Well, possibly because these dear friends dressed me in a Confederate colonel&rsquo;s uniform and insisted that I accompany them on the walk. The surge of emotion they received when greeted by the troops and ordinary members of the public was palpable. Their understanding of their alter egos in terms of character and method of portrayal was matched only by their deep desire to recreate this historic moment to perfection &mdash; and I was a very lucky Englishman not only to observe this but be a part of it as well.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">The knowledge they possess about the war was such that I felt these famous generals were back in the saddle. I saw people weeping as they greeted them and there was a very poignant scene when a young Union private, with tears in his eyes, was saluted by General Lee at the High Water Mark. The playing of &ldquo;Taps&rdquo; along the length of the wall by many buglers was a stroke of genius, and the silence whilst this was being done provided an intensely profound feeling among the spectators and the re-enactors.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">America has its grand scenery, it great cities, its fantastic museums and delightful byways, but what it possesses in abundance is the strength of its population. I was very proud that day to be an honorary American, if only for a short time, and to have the opportunity to understand a little more about the American psyche and also to experience the intensity of the human history and emotion of places like Gettysburg.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">What makes America the great country it is?</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Its people &hellip;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>David Fisher</b> writes from Leicester, England.</p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> GMT http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=53 David Fisher CCA Composer of the Month – SEPTEMBER 2013 - David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=54 <p><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 6 36 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 41 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>YOUR FEATURED COMPOSITIONS OF THE MONTH:</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p><b>Laudate Dominum </b>&ndash; a cantata for soprano choir and orchestra</p> <!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 2371 13515 Kingfisher Chorale 112 31 15855 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} table.MsoTableGrid {mso-style-name:"Table Gridmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-priority:59; mso-style-unhide:no; border:solid windowtext 1.0pt; mso-border-alt:solid windowtext .5pt; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-border-insideh:.5pt solid windowtext; mso-border-insidev:.5pt solid windowtext; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 6 37 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 42 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>INSTRUMENTAL AND/OR VOCAL RESOURCES USED:</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p><b>Soprano soloist, SATB Choir, Symphony Orchestra </b>[2,2,0,2; 2,2,0,0 &amp; Strings. 2 clarinets were added for movements 2 &amp; 3 in the&nbsp;2003 &nbsp;and&nbsp;1999 versions although these remain optional for movement 1. Originally written for authentic C18th orchestra]</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 6 39 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 44 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>FIRST PERFORMANCE DETAILS &ndash; IF RELEVANT:</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p><b>Movement 1: 16th November 1996; Movement 3: 27th March 1999; Movement 2: 5th April 2003 all in Derby Cathedral.</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 6 39 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 44 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>PERFORMERS ON YOUR RECORDING &ndash; IF RELEVANT:</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p><b>Dame Emma Kirkby [soprano], Derby Choral Union, Midland Baroque Orchestra [Leader:</b>&nbsp;<strong>Diane Terry], David Fisher [conductor]</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 24 140 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 163 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>OF THE WORK(S) YOU HAVE SELECTED FOR THE COMPOSER OF THE MONTH FEATURE, WHAT WAS THE SOURCE/INSPIRATION/COMMISSION WHICH SET THIS PIECE OR THESE PIECES IN MOTION?</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>When Sir Charles Groves died, the Derby Choral Union (recognised by &ldquo;Making Music&rsquo; as the oldest established choral society in the country) lost a valuable and well-respected President. As I had just become the Musical Director of this famous choir, I was asked for my suggestions as to who could replace the eminent conductor. I put forward Emma Kirkby&rsquo;s name as she is a singer who started in choirs and who by that time was the world&rsquo;s greatest early music soprano and adjudged by a later BBC poll as one of the top ten sopranos of all time. Little did I think she&rsquo;d accept but she did on the understanding that she was &lsquo;Patron&rsquo; rather then &lsquo;President&rsquo;. As a patron is &ldquo;A person who gives support to an organisation, cause, or activity&rdquo; rather than being a titular head, this lead to a series of three concerts which Emma Kirkby gave with Derby Choral Union in my time with the splendid choir. The original commission was from East Midlands&rsquo; Arts.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 23 136 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 158 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>WHAT WOULD BE A GOOD PROGRAMME NOTE FOR THIS WORK WHICH EXPLAINS THE STRUCTURE, USE OF MELODY AND HARMONY AND ANY TECHNICAL POINTS RELATED TO THE PERFORMERS?</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>The works are already described in the works page of my pieces but I repeat here the overview of the cantata which I wrote in 2003 to explain the addition of the final movement which was the virtuoso aria for Emma and orchestra alone:</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><b>&ldquo;I was pleased to be asked by Derby Choral Union to choose a patron for the choir when I started my tenure with them in 1992. Sir Charles Groves [the President at the time] had recently died. I wanted, instead of a famous conductor, one of the world&rsquo;s most distinctive voices as Patron and was delighted when she accepted. It was, therefore, a great honour to be asked to compose a work for my choir at the time and its Patron. I was very aware of the history of the choir [which dates back to 1793] so I thought it would be appropriate to write in Classical pitch [A=430] to accommodate Emma and reflect the history of the choir too. This meant that I had re-learn some of my composing skills to write for the original instruments of the late 18th century. I had a great deal of help from some of the players in the orchestra, notably the brilliant and world-renowned pair of brass players: <a href="http://www.halsteadmusic.co.uk/about.html">Tony Halstead</a> and <a href="http://www.aam.co.uk/#/who-we-are/musicians/david-blackadder.aspx">David Blackadder</a> on natural horn and <a href="http://www.londontrumpetchoir.com/Members/blackadder/index.html">natural trumpet </a>respectively. I also greatly appreciated the superb advice, bowing skills and orchestral nous of <a href="http://www.musicadonumdei.org/meet%20the%20players.htm">Diane Terry</a> who led her orchestra [<a href="http://www.musicadonumdei.org/">Midland Baroque</a>] for each of the three Emma concerts. The commission, with funds made available from East Midlands&rsquo; Arts, allowed me to compose freely for what I considered the choir&rsquo;s and Emma Kirkby&rsquo;s strengths. The SSATBB scoring reflects the choir&rsquo;s numbers although the texture was increased to add sonority to the last movement.</b><b>&nbsp;From the outset it was clear that the composition could grow in size with the choir in a series of concerts planned with Dame Emma [as she has deservedly become] and this presented me with a huge challenge. I needed to compose pieces that would, eventually, form a complete cantata but also allow each section to be independent as required. This also allowed me as composer/conductor to experiment over a long period to such a degree that, when I decided that the orchestration of the virtuoso aria needed clarinets, I revisited the entire work and added clarinets to the texture. This has, strangely, made Laudate Dominum much more useable for performers who can choose the movements to suit concert circumstances. In fact, even the &lsquo;Angel&rsquo; aria in the first movement can be (and has been used) as a separate anthem in church services.&rdquo;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">The first movement is described as follows and, in the absence of a score (apart from the &ldquo;<strong>Angel Aria</strong>&rdquo;), I have added timings to follow the structure of this movement:</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><b>The universality of the text &ldquo;O praise the Lord all ye people&rdquo; is emphasised by the use of four languages: Latin, German, English and French. It is in ternary form with an introduction and coda. After the horns and trumpets announce the fanfare theme [0:02] which unifies the work, the choir sing all the languages in turn: Latin [0.27], German: [1:12], and English [1:37] except for French, with two distinctive themes allocated to each text. The first section closes with the whole choir singing the fanfare figure [2:00] before the soprano soloist begins the French text [2:36] in a slow and lyrical melody in C major accompanied by pulsating strings, oboe solo and flutes. The choir joins the soloist [4:21] in the second part of the middle section before a long cadence brings back the original E flat tonality [5:40]. The third section begins with another choral fanfare [5:50] before the reintroduction of all the earlier themes [6:17] now in a multi-layered texture of increasing complexity. A giant eight-part double canon ensues [6:57] and this is in turn followed by a shorter harmonised canon [7:34] before the climax of the work is reached in two massive statements of &ldquo;Laudate&rdquo; [8:00]. A tranquil section marks [8:25] the re-entry of the soprano soloist to end the movement. The horns play a closing fanfare [8:58] which ends the movement as quietly as it began. &nbsp;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none">The recording can be accessed by clicking here: <strong><em><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/music/161/01%20Laudate%20Dominum%20[1996].m4a">Laudate Dominum</a></em></strong>.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><i>Laudate Dominum omnes gentes,</i> <i>laudate eum omnes populi.</i> <i>Quoniam confirmata est super nos misericordia ejus</i> <i>et veritas Domini manet in aeternam.</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none">Lobet den Herrn, alle Heiden; preiset ihn, alle V&ouml;lker! Denn seine Gnade und Wahrheit waltet &uuml;ber uns in Ewigkeit.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none">O praise the Lord all ye nations: praise him all ye people. For his merciful kindness is great toward us: and the truth of the Lord endureth for ever.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Louez l&rsquo;Eternal, vous toutes les nations, c&eacute;l&eacute;brez-le, vous tous les peuples! Car sa bont&eacute; pour nous est grande, et sa fid&eacute;lit&eacute; dure &agrave; toujours.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><b>The next two movements are described in the list of my works. Movement 2 [<i><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=826">Laudate Dominum de caelis</a></i>] &amp; Movement 3 [<i><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=651">Alleluia</a></i>].</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><b>CRITICAL&nbsp;FEEDBACK:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><b>Emma Kirkby: </b>&quot;<i>Thanks for a lovely bit of writing - for me and all the forces!&nbsp; I really enjoyed it.</i>&quot;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><b>From an interview with Emma Kirkby and Pierre M. Bellemare&nbsp;(July 13, 2004) published in <a href="http://www.scena.org/lsm/sm9-10/Emma-Kirkby_en.htm">La Scena Musicale</a>, Canada&acute;s Classical Music Magazine:&nbsp;LSM [PMB]: </b>&ldquo;&hellip;and what about the music that David Fisher has composed for you?&rdquo;&nbsp;<b>EK:</b> &ldquo;<i>David Fisher is a talented choirmaster and composer. He wrote a piece for me to do with the wonderful Derby Choral Union--one of Britains oldest groups and still very healthy today, and of which Im proud to be a patron. It is a very singable piece for me and there are bits that are great to listen to and pretty challenging to sing.</i>&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><b>Liz Clarke [Derbyshire Now - February 1997]: </b>&quot;<i>Emma Kirkby was provided with a vehicle to show a packed cathedral her superb talent and David Fisher even managed to stretch, test and ultimately show off the choir. [Emma Kirkby]...loves the unpredictability of performing live and her enjoyment of the piece was obvious.&nbsp; Her beautiful voice and those perfect high notes were heard to their best advantage...there was thunderous applause and David Fisher glowed with pride as he led Emma from the stage.</i>&quot;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><b>Members of the audience wrote:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none">&quot;... <i>the theme given to Emma [Kirkby] is one of the most beautiful themes I have ever heard.&nbsp; When I heard it my hair stood on end</i>...&quot;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none">&ldquo;<i>I have attended many of your concerts and thoroughly enjoyed them but Saturday&rsquo;s was something special. Your music and Emma&rsquo;s voice &ndash; was so moving</i>.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none">&ldquo;<i>It was wonderful! The entire concert seemed to have a brilliance such as we have never heard before. The atmosphere was truly electric.</i>&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none">&ldquo;&hellip;<i>your composition is dynamic, moving and challenging to sing! It has everything that music should have &ndash; and more</i>.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;mso-pagination:none; mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><b>Will Todd [composer]: </b>&quot;<i>I was glad to hear the Laudate Dominum live - made the solo sections more immediate and beautiful. I really enjoyed it and I congratulate you...</i>.&quot;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 10 57 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 66 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>WHEN DID YOU FIRST START COMPOSING AND WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST PIECE?</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>I always remember trying things out on the piano [I&rsquo;m a self-taught pianist, alas] and my first recognisable piece was for two trebles and organ at the age of 11 &ndash; not surprising as I was a chorister in Leicester Cathedral at the time. I showed it to the estimable Jonathan Gregory the Head Chorister at the time [later Master of Music at Leicester from 1994-2010] and he took it to show Dr Gray who was the Organist and Master of the Choristers. Dr Gray was very kind about the piece and an irregular but considerable number of sessions with him allowed me to develop my skills.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 14 85 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 98 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>WHO WAS IT THAT FIRST ENCOURAGED YOU TO DEVELOP YOUR INTEREST IN COMPOSING AND HOW DID THEY HELP?</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p><strong>George Gray</strong> was vital in my development. He taught me four part harmony and as a young teenager I revelled in the exploration and study of Bach chorales. I composed several works at the time although the first I am happy to recognise was my <b><i>Domine, non est</i></b> written for my mother on Mothering Sunday when I was 14. When Dr Gray retired from the cathedral I wrote a huge &quot;Gloria&quot; for him in up to eight parts&nbsp;with organ accompaniment. After that I wrote an <i>a cappella</i> anthem [<b><i>O praise the Lord</i></b>] for <strong>Bob Prime</strong>, who was the Assistant Organist at the time, to mark his move to the Lake District. Bob [or Mr Prime to me!] always showed an interest in the work I was doing and often gave valuable advice on structure. <strong>Peter White</strong>, who followed George Gray as Master of Music, was also my teacher at Alderman Newton&rsquo;s Boys&rsquo; Grammar School, and he refined my skills. He was a perfectionist in harmonic construction and his precision and brilliance in explaining unusual modulations stay with me now. After I stopped being a treble and prior to going to Durham University I wrote one of my most enduring pieces for Peter and the Leicester Cathedral Choir: <b><i>Mary Laid Her Child</i></b>. First performed by the Vienna Boys&rsquo; Choir it has become a staple in many places at Christmas although it is also an Easter carol. Subsequent teachers in higher education did not add to my skills except to encourage me to write longer works.</p> <p>Mind you, it is due to people like the extrordinarily talented teacher-conductor <strong>Richard Stevens</strong> whose repeat commissions for the Farnham Festival allowed me to attempt greater and greater things for his young performers. There is nothing that he couldn&acute;t get them to perform. Though he is also an exceptional countertenor, it is his accomplishments in the area of youth music which can rarely be matched by anyone else in the country. He was also fortunate to be able to call on his superb pianist wife <strong>Jean</strong> to play the&nbsp;premi&egrave;res of&nbsp;all of my pieces for Farnham.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Possibly the greatest believer in my talent, however, is my brother <strong>Morris</strong> who is an outstandingly gifted musician. He is a professional conductor, singer and arranger and his active encouragement of my pieces right from when we were both adolescents has been of enormous benefit to me. I continue to be extremely grateful for his support. knowledge and experience and for his unerring sense of constructive criticism. My sister, <strong>Elizabeth</strong>, whilst a good choir mezzo herself was an arts management supremo and it was she alone who worked very hard to gain the funding for composition of my <em><strong>Requiem</strong></em> which, to date, is still my largest work. I am also fortunate to be married to <strong>Pauline</strong>, the most patient woman on the planet, who not only inspires my compostions but has written superb lyrics for the three Farnham commissions and as a result has been commissioned herself to write lyrics for four more Franham pieces, two of which were composed by inspirational <strong>Will Todd</strong>.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">I should also point out that had <strong>Miss Joyce Moon</strong> (an amazing teacher who spotted and developed my singing talent at primary school) and <strong>Mr David Shaw</strong> (whose wonderful musicanship and enthusiastic brilliance at my grammar school encouraged a wider love of music) not been so good in their vocations I might not even have been in the profession long enough to write this paragraph!</p> <!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 21 121 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 141 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>WHO DO YOU CONSIDER YOUR GREATEST INSPIRATIONS IN TERMS OF THE MAJOR COMPOSERS AND WHICH OF THEIR WORKS HAS INFLUENCED YOU THE MOST AND WHY?</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal">Britten has always been a massive influence. His writing for the voice in the English language was only equalled in the C17th by Purcell. As a performer and conductor of English Choral Music there are several who have influenced me: S. S. Wesley, C. V. Stanford, Herbert Howells with, occasionally the textural delights of William Byrd.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 12 73 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 84 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE TO SOMEONE WHO HAS NEVER HEARD YOUR MUSIC BEFORE?</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>Melodic and tonal but with complex musical devices and intensely discordant moments relieved by sumptuous harmonies. Will Todd, one of Britain&acute;s greatest and most highly respected composers at the moment, wrote of my music: <em><strong>&quot;</strong></em><b style="color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify; "><i>His music is cleverly layered, allowing the music to move from areas of complex and dissonant harmony through to tranquil and beautiful passages of lush, romantic consonance, and it is this quality which makes his music enjoyable and memorable.&quot; </i></b>Perhaps it is better for composers to rely on our fellow musicians, composers and members of our audiences to describe our music!</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 6 39 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 44 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>WHAT DO YOU FEEL IS ORIGINAL IN YOUR MUSIC?</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>Very little, I expect. Almost all of the music I have composed have been written for specific occasions when the subject matter, the instruments available and the vocal resources are prescribed for me. I like to think that there are times when listeners can hear a piece and recognise my style. One of the best music critics in the country, Neil Crutchley &ndash; formerly of the Leicester Mercury &ndash; has a knowledge of choral music which would stagger even the most well-informed in the field. He has an unerring sense of what is good (and bad) and how it relates to other composers in a particular genre. Perhaps it is better in this section to quote him at the end of a review he wrote of <b><i>Laudate Dominum</i></b>: &ldquo;<i>In all this music, the composer&rsquo;s musical ancestry is never in doubt. Vaughan Williams, Howells, Britten and Walton are there but there is also a distinct musical personality of his own. In its sensitivity to words and the great gift of singable melody his music also recalls to mind that of John Rutter and in the field of popular choral music of real quality, there can be no greater compliment.</i>&rdquo;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 25 143 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 167 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>HOW DO YOU WORK? WHAT METHODS OF CREATIVITY AND WORK ETHIC DO YOU HAVE? DO YOU SOLELY USE MUSICAL TECHNOLOGY OR DO PAPER AND PENCIL STILL FORM A PART OF YOUR PROCESS?</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>I always start with pencil and manuscript paper but this is generally after the structure and the words I am setting have been worked out already. I seldom start any piece without the structure already in place - even if it changes later. Working at the piano helps me develop chordally, though melodic lines just happen. I never have to work at them. All modern composers are grateful for music scoring programs which allow us to print out parts and edit our work without the troubling and tiresome rewrites which occurred before computers allowed us to do this. The trouble is that students nowadays have very sloppy manuscript work if they actually write anything down. Much of my early training with George Gray and Peter White was to ensure correct alignment and planning each page to ensure the optimum use of space. These were skills I used all through my teaching career until computers became so prevalent.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>WHAT PROJECTS ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON?</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Having just completed a variation for wind quintet and <b><i>The Legacy</i></b> for Dr Chris Johns and the choirs of Leicester Cathedral, my next piece is for Joachim Diessner in his justly famous series of concerts under the title of A Countertenor&rsquo;s Christmas which are performed in K&ouml;ln every December. Another work being forward-planned after that is for Madeley Parish Church in September 2014.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>TO FINISH, WHO OR WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong><em>[N.B. </em></strong><em>I did find, as did all my fellow composers, very hard to do so I have selected the best of a variety of performers and works which cover nearly all the music I love. You&rsquo;ll be able to tell by observing the performers and guessing the pieces. For Barenboim and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, for example, it is Bruckner symphonies.</em><strong><em>]</em></strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>GENR</b><strong>E&nbsp;OF MUSIC</strong><b>?</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Oratorio</b> [Elgar &amp; Handel] &amp; <b>Opera</b> [Rossini, Mozart &amp; Massenet]</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>INSTRUMENTALIST?</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Impossible to single one out. My favourite instruments are <b>Clarinet</b> [<i>Alan Hacker</i> &amp; <i>Gervase de Peyer</i>], <b>Cello</b> [<i>Jacqueline de P</i><i>r</i><i>&eacute;</i><i> </i>and <i>Pierre Fournier</i>], <b>Trumpet</b> [<i>Maurice Andr</i><i>&eacute; </i>&amp; ex-pupil <i>David Blackadder</i>], <b>Trombone</b> [<i>Christian Lindberg</i>], <b>Piano</b> [<i>Wilhelm Backhaus </i>&amp; <i>Daniel Barenboim</i>]</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>SINGER?</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Too many voices especially with the voice being the greatest of all instruments! <b>Soprano</b> [<i>Emma Kirkby</i>, <i>Lucia Popp</i>, <i>Joan Sutherland</i>, <i>Mady Mespl</i><i>&eacute;</i>,&nbsp;<i>Anna Moffo &amp;</i>&nbsp;<em>Lenka&nbsp;&Scaron;kornickov&aacute;] <b>Mezzo</b> [<i>Marilyn Horne</i>, <i>Della Jones</i> &amp; <i>Joyce di Donato</i>], <b>Countertenor</b> [<i>Derek Lee Ragin</i>, <i>Philippe Jaroussky</i>, <i>Joachim Diessner von Isensee and Philip Manser</i>], <b>Tenor</b> [<i>Nicolai Gedda</i>, <i>Michel Cadiou</i>, Juan Diego Florez,&nbsp;<i>Placido Domingo</i>, <i>Peter Pears</i> and <i>Andrew King</i>], <b>Bass</b> [<i>Ivan Rebroff</i>, <i>Gottlob Frick</i> &amp; <i>Bill Snape</i>]</em> <!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 1 12 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 12 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>CHAMBER ENSEMBLE?</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><i>Allegri String Quartet</i>, <i>Borodin String Quartet</i>, <i>Philip Jones Brass Ensemble</i> and <i>Serenata Winds</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>ORCHESTRA?</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Depends on the repertoire: <b>Orchestre de la Suisse Romande </b>[under <i>Ernest Ansermet</i>], <b>Orchestra National de France</b> [under <i>Jean Martinon</i>], <b>Chicago Symphony Orchestra</b> [under <i>Daniel Barenboim</i>] &amp; the <b>London Symphony Orchestra</b> [under any conductor!]</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>CHORAL CONDUCTORS?</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Paul Spicer</strong>, <strong>John Rutter</strong>, <strong>John Alldis</strong>, <strong>D G</strong>&nbsp;<strong>Davies</strong>&nbsp;and <strong>Richard Stevens</strong>.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>CONCERT VENUE?</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Wigmore Hall</b>, <b>St John&rsquo;s Smith Square</b>, <b>Symphony Hall</b>, Birmingham &amp; the chapel of the <b>College of the Venerable Bede</b>, Durham University.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>PIECE OF MUSIC?</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Peter Grimes</b> [<i>Britten</i>], <b>Dream of Gerontius</b> [<i>Elgar</i>], <strong>Creation</strong> [<em>Haydn</em>],&nbsp;<b>Guillaume Tell</b> &amp; <b>Cenerentola</b> [<i>Rossini</i>], <b>Messa di Gloria</b> [<i>Puccini</i>], <strong>St John Passion</strong> [<em>Bach</em>],&nbsp;<b>La Navarraise</b> [<i>Massenet</i>],&nbsp;<b>Piano Concerto </b>[<i>Piern</i><i>&eacute;</i>]<b> </b>&amp;<b> Violin Concerto </b>[<i>Arensky</i>]</p> <!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 7 46 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 52 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <!--EndFragment--> <!--EndFragment--> GMT http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=54 David Fisher LEICESTER CATHEDRAL LEGACY CONCERT, 12th October 2013 - David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=58 <!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 59 340 Kingfisher Chorale 2 1 398 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 59 340 Kingfisher Chorale 2 1 398 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 65 371 Kingfisher Chorale 3 1 435 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Photos:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>1.</b> David Shaw &amp; David Fisher</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>2.</b>&nbsp;Darron Moore&nbsp;&amp; David Fisher</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Thumbnails:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Row 1.</b> David Fisher [15]; Bob King; David Fisher [18]; George Gray</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Row 2.</b> Peter White; S S Wesley; Edward Bairstow; David Fisher [Uni Y1]; Chris Johns</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Row 3.</b> Edgar Bainton; Benjamin Britten; D G Davies; R Vaughan Williams</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Row 4.</b> Thomas Morley; Charles Wood; David Shaw; Roy Sawbridge; Michael White</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Poster of the concert.</b></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal">David Fisher [chorister from 1963-69] writes: &ldquo;Having reached my seventh decade and having retired from a full-time position as the Head of a Performing Arts faculty, I naturally took the opportunity to look back over the last half century to partly evaluate how my life-long professional career in music was possible. Having a good treble voice was a good starting point, having gifted primary and secondary school music teachers certainly helped but it was the stellar training over many years in the cathedral choir with musicians of national standing which was to tilt the balance. This concert, therefore, is an opportunity to give thanks to those who created me as a musician and have helped to develop those skills in my formative years and beyond.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">A dictionary definition of &lsquo;legacy&rsquo; embraces several meanings but for the purposes of this concert it is &ldquo;something that someone has achieved that continues after they stop working or die&rdquo;. It&rsquo;s about sharing what you have learned that is handed down, endowed or conveyed from one person to another. It is something inherited or received from predecessors so, in fact, all those that taught me were themselves the inheritors of many centuries of musical training.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">This philosophy was expounded by Michael Palin in recent days when he wrote: &ldquo;I find as I get older I&rsquo;ve learned more about the world and I want to share in with people&hellip;I just hope that the work I do does leave a mark, and just doesn&rsquo;t blow away like the dust.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">This is not a new concept, however, as Lao Tzu &ndash; a Chinese philosopher who lived over 400 years before Christ stated:</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-indent:36.0pt"><b><i>If you know when you have enough, you are wealthy;</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-indent:36.0pt"><b><i>If you carry your intentions to completion, you are resolute;</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-indent:36.0pt"><b><i>If you live a long &amp; creative life, you will leave an eternal legacy</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">One hopes that the young people in this concert, under the direction of Chris Johns&rsquo; superb team, will look back at this evening and their time in the cathedral with equal fondness and remember what it was to belong and to learn. If any of them go on to careers where they can pass on their musical skills to others, then their training will have been invaluable. Even if they follow non-musical careers, the choristers will take with them the benefits of a world class musical education whilst learning to organise their time and develop essential life skills such as self-reliance, self-discipline and working as a team member to produce the highest possible standards.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">Apart from the musicians who are mentioned later, what were my musical highlights as a chorister? Singing the ripieno choir in Bach&rsquo;s <i>St Matthew&rsquo;s Passion</i> with the Leicester Bach Choir under George Gray; participating in the Three Choirs&rsquo; Festival alongside Lichfield and Birmingham with George Thalben Ball on the organ; being part of George Gray&rsquo;s glorious last service at Easter 1969 and in awe at the equally brilliant first evensong of Peter White with Stanford&rsquo;s anthem <i>The Lord is my Shepherd</i>; broadcasting six Choral Evensongs and a Songs of Praise from the Cathedral whilst learning some of the greatest music ever written for the church: <i>O clap your hands together</i> [Orlando Gibbons]; <i>O, sing unto the Lord</i> [Henry Purcell]; <i>Turn thee unto me</i> [William Boyce]; <i>The Cherubic Hymn</i> [L&rsquo;vovsky]; <i>Blessed be the God and Father</i> [S S Wesley]; <i>How lovely is thy dwelling place</i> [Johannes Brahms]; <i>Glory and honour and laud be to thee</i> [Charles Wood]; <i>O how glorious</i> [Basil Harwood]; <i>Let all mortal flesh keep silence</i> [Edward Bairstow] with the <i>Magnificat</i> and <i>Nunc Dimittis</i> settings by Stanford [in C], Bairstow [in D], Howells [New College setting] and Jackson [in C for trebles]. Now when I look back I remember singing arias from oratorios at the Monday evensongs with the other boys. Arias that I&rsquo;d never dream we could have attempted when I started as a chorister: <i>How beautiful are the feet</i> [Handel&rsquo;s <i>Messiah</i>] and <i>I&rsquo;ll follow</i> [Bach&rsquo;s <i>St John Passion</i>].</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">My fellow choristers and songmen and members of the congregation will have their own favourites but today&rsquo;s choristers will have some by composers not even born when I was singing treble: Will Todd and Eric Whitacre, for example. What, I wonder, will you remember from tonight&rsquo;s concert? Whatever comes to mind will become part of the Leicester Cathedral Legacy.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><b>The descriptions which follow contain enough detail to explain the work&rsquo;s origins as well as making links between the vast network of interconnected musicians who have been influenced, often unknowingly, by the same musicians. I attempt to explain some of the relationships such as the fact that many years ago my brother Morris conducted a Puccini opera with a brilliant boy soloist singing the part of a shepherd boy. The opera? <i>Tosca</i>. The soloist? Dr Chris Johns. See how many other connections you can find&hellip;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><strong>NOTES:</strong></p> <p><b><i>Domine, non est &nbsp; &nbsp;</i></b><b>&nbsp;</b><i>David Fisher </i>[b.1952]</p> <p>(Performed by Kingfisher Chorale directed by David Fisher)</p> <p class="MsoNormal">This work is the earliest&nbsp;work&nbsp;I recognise from my output and this is probably because the sessions with Dr George Gray were having an effect on my textures and suspensions. I was 14 at the time when this was written for Mothering Sunday 1967 [5th March], yet it was not until my mother&rsquo;s memorial service that the work was performed for the first time performed by Kingfisher Chorale in Castle Donington Methodist Church on 1st November 2001. A second performance took place at St James the Greater Church on 30th November 2002 at &ldquo;Fisher at Fifty&rdquo;. The Latin <i>Domine, non est</i> [from Psalm 131] is set in English as &lsquo;<i>Lord, I am not high-minded&rsquo;</i>. In this piece there is a baritone solo which was written with the voice of Dr. Robert [Bob] King in mind, one of the finest soloists in the Cathedral Choir. The Old Choristers are saddened to note that only this week we discovered that Bob King died on 25th September aged 90. Tonight&rsquo;s performance is dedicated to his memory. His picture is taken from the 1968 photograph of the Cathedral Choir hanging in the choir&rsquo;s Gardiner Room.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><b><i>Adam lay ybounden&nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><b>&nbsp; &nbsp;</b><i>David Fisher</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">(performed by Kingfisher Chorale &amp; Simon Headley directed by David Fisher)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Another early piece, this one written early in 1970 for a group called Octave. This was a group of eight friends based at Holy Apostles Church where Alan Warren was the vicar and later Precentor of Leicester Cathedral. The Rev. Alan Warren commissioned my first professional work which was <i>A Christmas Suite</i> for all the children at his church. I received the grand sum of 10 shillings [50p]. This carol, however, is not connected and is in ternary form [accompanied, <i>a cappella</i> and accompanied again] and composed with the Leicester Cathedral organ in mind.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/l0-Oaw9y6w4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><b><i>Mary Laid Her Child</i></b> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<b>&nbsp;</b><i>David Fisher</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">(performed by&nbsp;Kingfisher Chorale &amp; Simon Headley directed by David Fisher) &nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">This carol for Christmas or Easter is dedicated to Peter White &amp; Leicester Cathedral Choir and is published by Roberton Publications. First performed by the&nbsp;Vienna&nbsp;Boys&rsquo; Choir under Anton Neyder at Gloucester Cathedral in 1972 and then in dozens of cathedral and chapels in the UK and Australasia.&nbsp;It can be performed with or without organ accompaniment and it is the latter version heard this evening. Other notable performances have been at Leicester cathedral under Peter White; Chichester Cathedral in 1982 under Alan Thurlow [Assistant Organist at Durham Cathedral when I was at Durham University]. The carol was recorded <i>a cappella</i>&nbsp;on CD by Kingfisher Chorale in 1999 and more recently by the Roder Jongenskoor on their CD released&nbsp;in November 2011. Rintje te Wies, the Musical Director, writes in the CD notes: <strong>Mary Laid her child</strong>&nbsp;<i>is an especially atmospheric work in which a beautiful modal melody is heard in unison in the first verse and is followed by two and three voice settings, culminating in the six voice final verse with its exuberant final chord. The organ part provides the interludes which bind the work together.&quot;</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/la29fx5y30E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><b><i>Before the ending of the day&nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><b>&nbsp;</b><i>George Gray </i>[1897-1981]&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">(performed by&nbsp;Kingfisher Chorale directed by David Fisher)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">This gem by George Gray shows a real sensitivity for the words which are a translation of the ancient Latin hymn &ldquo;Te lucis ante terminum&rdquo;. Contrasting dynamics &amp; a free use of tonalities highlight every line and the piece ends triumphantly. This was always a favourite with the choir and is so beautiful that it is a shame Dr. Gray didn&rsquo;t write more although his sets of Responses are still very much in regular use at the cathedral.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ltJ8J-F6Src" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>Urbs beata</i></b><b><i> &nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><b>&nbsp;</b><i>Peter White </i>[1937-2007]</p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Simon Headley)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Peter White recorded his first LP [later transferred to CD] in 1976 and as his principal page turner for many years, I was privileged to help in his recording. Alas, it had to be recorded overnight from 11 pm and 6 am so teaching the following day proved rather difficult. The album showed Peter and the organ off to brilliant effect and he included pieces by his predecessors Gordon Slater and George Gray as well as some of his showpiece recital repertoire. He added his own composition which is dramatic &amp; well-constructed. &nbsp;Sub-titled &ldquo;Toccata for a Dedication Festival&rdquo; it is dedicated to the Provost at the time, the Very Rev. John C Hughes. It has a prominent tune in the pedals which leans towards Peter&rsquo;s love of the French repertoire, particularly Vierne and Messaien.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/LcETVmP5Cjg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>Lead me Lord&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i>Samuel Sebastian Wesley </i>[1810-1876]</p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Leicester Cathedral Choir &amp; Simon Headley directed by Chris Johns)</p> <p class="MsoNormal">A beautiful short work taken from the conclusion of Wesley&rsquo;s larger work: <i>Praise the Lord, O my soul</i>. It is included in this concert as it was chosen by George Gray to represent the choir on a very early edition of &ldquo;Songs of Praise&rdquo;. Elizabeth Holden, a wonderful contralto pupil of George&rsquo;s, performed the solo part. It proved to be a moving performance by the soloist and choir. Unfortunately I don&rsquo;t know if the recording was ever kept but I doubt it. I believe the recording was probably 1963. The piece is in binary form with the soloists being followed by the choir repeating the same phrase. The first one is transformed when the choir enters by stunning suspensions in the first two bars. Interestingly, Elizabeth Holden&rsquo;s legacy is that she became a vocal advisor to Leicestershire under Peter Fletcher and gave lessons to hundreds of singers including all those singing in the newly-formed Leicestershire Chorale.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/VE16IO2Zjhg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>Magnificat in D &nbsp; &nbsp;</i></b><i>Edward Bairstow </i>[1874-1946]</p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Leicester Cathedral Choir, Simon Headley, Songmen Emeriti, Old Choristers &amp; Kingfisher Chorale&nbsp;directed by David Fisher)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">George Gray was articled to Edward Bairstow at York &amp; his interpretations of Bairstow&rsquo;s work had the seal of authenticity on them. We could always sense Sir Edward on George&rsquo;s shoulder and this has been passed on to the all the singers in the choirs. This is a powerful setting of the Magnificat with broad melodies which contrast beautifully with the lyrical solo section of &ldquo;He rememb&rsquo;ring His mercy&rdquo; before the mighty &ldquo;Gloria&rdquo; thunders in. In this performance, we will be performing the extended setting of the <i>Nunc Dimittis</i> &ldquo;Gloria&rdquo; after the <i>Magnificat</i>.&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Fl_SbtH38qc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>Three Songs for Children&nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i>David Fisher</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Darron Moore&nbsp;with David Fisher - piano)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">The five songs for children were composed as a set of three and two individual songs which are not for children to sing but to make children think and to entertain them as well. &lsquo;Boy Fishing&rsquo; [September 1971] was dedicated to Bill Snape &ndash; the Madrigal Group&rsquo;s &ldquo;gifted soloist&rsquo; and &lsquo;Warning to Children&rsquo; [22nd November 1971 &ndash; St Cecilia&rsquo;s Day] was dedicated to my brother Morris. Both are serious songs in C minor which comment on children from an adult&rsquo;s perspective whereas &lsquo;King David &amp; King Solomon&rsquo;, &lsquo;What became of them?&rsquo; and &lsquo;Do you know?&rsquo; were written as a set in June 1972 and are settings of comic poems. Songs 4 &amp; 5 are in the second half.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">1. <i>What became of them</i>?</p> <p class="MsoNormal">2. <i>Boy Fishing</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">3. <i>King David &amp; King Solomon</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>Peace to this House &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i>Christopher Johns&nbsp; </i>[b. 1975]</p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Leicester Cathedral Choir &amp; Simon Headley directed by Chris Johns)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">Dr. John&rsquo;s first piece this evening is, like <i>The Legacy</i> and <i>Litany to the Holy Spirit</i>, a pi&egrave;ce d&acute;occasion and was &ldquo;Written for the opening of St Martin&rsquo;s House on 10th June 2011 and dedicated to the missing apostrophe&rdquo;. In contrasts a deceptively simple refrain which becomes more richly harmonised as the piece progresses with psalm-chant-like sections, sometimes harmonised and on two occasions in unison. The words are mainly from the New Testament with two verses from the Book of Psalms.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TU8pqYfwm_I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>And I saw a new heaven &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i>Edgar Bainton </i>[1880-1956]</p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Leicester Cathedral Choir &amp; Simon Headley&nbsp;directed by Chris Johns)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">Edgar Bainton&rsquo;s output was considerable and yet this anthem, completed in June 1928, remains his most enduring and famous composition amongst many neglected works. Bainton was prolifically talented and when he was 19 he won a scholarship to study with Sir Charles Villiers Stanford, at the Royal College of Music. <i>And I saw a new heaven</i> is a serenely beautiful work with melodies that flow effortlessly from the start. Interestingly there is a connection with Bairstow as Sir Edward awarded Bainton an honorary DMus at Durham University. It was, in fact, Durham Cathedral that I heard this piece for the first time on the recommendation of Andrew King (a friend and fellow singer in Schola Cantorum) who sang in the cathedral choir under the Organist and Master of the Choristers Conrad Eden and later in The Consort of Musicke with Emma Kirkby. Dr Robert Scandrett wrote: &ldquo;It is impossible to listen to anthems like this without imagining them in the soaring acoustics of Durham&rdquo;. Hearing the work will take me back to being a student again especially the intensely beautiful melody &ldquo;And God shall wipe away all tears&rdquo;.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/nox06RHx3_4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>The Father &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</i></b><i>David Fisher</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Kingfisher Chorale&nbsp;directed by Giles Turner)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><i>The Litanie</i>, with its accompanying motet <i>Ave Regina caelorum</i>, was written between 1973-1976, and the quartet of movements won the Northern Sinfonia Chorus &ldquo;Young Composer of the Year&rdquo; award and was sung by the choir in March 1978.&nbsp;Set to mystical words by John Donne, the suite of four movements [the second being one of two works dedicated to Bob Prime the Assistant Organist at Leicester Cathedral] are all linked by the plainsong liturgy for The Litany which used to be sung at Leicester Cathedral. <i>The Father</i>,&nbsp;tonight&rsquo;s piece from the four, had its world premi&egrave;re&nbsp;by the Mixolydian Consort in 1973 and features a prominent soprano solo. The whole work was revised&nbsp;in 1979 for the Leicestershire Chorale under Peter Fletcher. The whole suite was recorded for the British Music Council by the Burrows Choir directed by Brian Blythe Daubney in 1988 and in his sleeve notes he wrote: &ldquo;David Fisher&rsquo;s <i>The Litanie</i> seizes on the devout yet sensuous quality of the verse of the dual-natured John Donne. There are moments of growth from gentle reflection to impassioned intensity.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b><i>Ave Regina caelorum &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i style="text-align: right; ">David Fisher</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:15.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">(performed by Kingfisher Chorale&nbsp;directed by Giles Turner)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">This piece is the motet preceding <i>The Litanie</i> &ndash; see above. Dedicated to Philip Manser [of St George&rsquo;s Chapel and then Lincoln Cathedral] &amp; first performed St Asaph Cathedral, 1976. There have been many performances all over the world after it was issued by Roberton Publications and it was also recorded as an LP by Lincoln Cathedral Choir in 1982 and released on CD in 2007. Dr Philip Marshall [who, incidentally, succeeded Leicester Cathedral&rsquo;s Gordon Slater to the position at Lincoln] wrote on the sleeve notes: &ldquo;This short work, from the composer&rsquo;s <i>Introit and The Litanie</i>, was written in 1974. The idiom is mystical and sensitive, showing and original mind, with a sense of vocal line and a deft and delicate handling of dissonance&rdquo;. A richly harmonised chorus is sung three times and these frame two verses sung by a trio of soloists.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>The Legacy&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i>David Fisher</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Leicester Cathedral Choir, Simon Headley, Songmen Emeriti, Old Choristers &amp; Kingfisher Chorale&nbsp;directed by Chris Johns)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">Written for and: <b>&quot;<i>Dedicated to Dr Chris Johns, Simon Headley, the Choirs of Leicester Cathedral, the Leicester Cathedral Old Choristers&acute; Association and the magnificent musical legacy these represent</i>&quot;</b>.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">The whole piece in terms of words and music reflect the development of musicians in cathedrals and other environments. This legacy begins with meandering chords [showing the beginning of the learning process] under which, in the pedals, is the tune taken from Tallis reflecting the legacy from that composer to the present day. The discords, nevertheless, suggest the keys to be used later. The young voices are contrasted with a mature choir showing both ends of the process. The next interlude is still discordant but with more shape and the Tallis melody still in the pedals is dissipating. Here the cathedral choir(s) are now contrasted with &lsquo;older&rsquo; [generally] gentlemen of the Songman Emeriti and the Old Choristers touching on the passing on of wisdom. The next interlude shows the Tallis has almost gone and a new, more confident, style begins. This leads in to a massive section [again, like the other two sections, <i>a cappella</i>] in up to eleven parts. The original Tallis canon is contrasted by all the melodies used earlier with the addition of another much faster canon of my own in the cathedral altos and basses whilst the second choir sings homophonically. At the end of this section the organ and choirs come together in a coda in which the full organ (with the addition of the tuba) comes to the fore in a very noisy conclusion. The rising keys [E, G &amp; B flat]&nbsp;show upwards steps of learning too.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 209 1197 Kingfisher Chorale 9 2 1404 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>VERSE 1 </b><b>[Boys &amp; Girls of Choir 1 with Choir 3]</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>CHOIR 1:</b> Awake, my soul, and with the sun Your daily stage of duty run; Shake off dull sloth, and joyful rise To pay your morning sacrifice<b> (F.H. Barth</b><b>&eacute;</b><b>l</b><b>&eacute;</b><b>mon </b>[1741-1808]<b>)</b> <b>CHOIR 3:</b> Train a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not turn from it &hellip; <b>(Proverbs 22:6)</b>&hellip; But, as for you, continue in what you have learned &hellip; because you know those from whom you learned it.<b> (2 Timothy 3:14)</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>VERSE 2 </b><b>[Choir 1 with Choir 2]</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>CHOIR 1:</b> Redeem your misspent time that&rsquo;s past; And live this day were it your last; Improve your talent with due care; For the great day yourself prepare. <b>(F.H. Barth</b><b>&eacute;</b><b>l</b><b>&eacute;</b><b>mon </b>[1741-1808]<b>)</b> <b>CHOIR 3:</b> By wisdom a house is built, and by understanding it is established &hellip; a wise man is full of strength, and a man of knowledge enhances his might &hellip; <b>(Proverbs 24:3,5)</b> &hellip; Wisdom rests in the heart of a man of understanding.<b> (Proverbs 14:33-15)</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>VERSE 3 </b><b>[All voices]</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>CHOIR 1 [S &amp; T] &amp; CHOIR 2:</b> Praise God, from whom all blessings flow; Praise him, all creatures here below; Praise him above, ye heav&rsquo;nly host; Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.<b> (Bishop T. Ken </b>[1637-1711]<b>) CHOIR 1 [A &amp; B]: </b>Awake, awake, ye heav&rsquo;nly choir, May your devotion me inspire, That I like you my age may spend, Like you may on my God attend.<b> (F.H. Barth</b><b>&eacute;</b><b>l</b><b>&eacute;</b><b>mon </b>[1741-1808]<b>) + plus ALL </b>the previous biblical references: 11 individual voice parts singing at once.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/JDgXZjgyDsc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><b>INTERVAL</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><b><i>Jubilate Deo &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i style="text-align: right; ">Benjamin Britten </i>[1913-1976]</p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Leicester Cathedral Choir,&nbsp;Kingfisher Chorale &amp;&nbsp;Simon Headley&nbsp;directed by Chris Johns)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">In 1934 Britten composed his first canticle setting, <i>Te Deum </i>in C, and followed that quickly with a companion piece, <i>Jubilate Deo</i> in E flat major. It was not published until after the composer&rsquo;s death. In 1961, however, he composed a new companion piece: the <i>Jubilate Deo</i> in C. In the words of Paul Spicer [Conductor of the Leicester Bach Choir from 1986-1992, a choir which was founded by Gordon Slater at Leicester Cathedral]: &ldquo;With its lively and spirited organ accompaniment and its simple and direct vocal phrases it positively bubbles with the joyful mood of the words&rdquo; (Britten Choral Guide). The Jubilate Deo, written for St George&rsquo;s, Windsor, at the request of the Duke of Edinburgh but first performed in Leeds Parish Church, is full of interesting tonalities, bright organ flourishes, and contrasts of tempi and texture that combine to create a festive atmosphere.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/q2REdmT_SjM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>The Ballad of Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i>Benjamin Britten</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by the men of Kingfisher Chorale with Sian Loyns - piano -&nbsp;directed by David Fisher)</p> <p class="MsoNormal">1943, the year in which he composed his cantata <i>Rejoice in the Lamb Serenade </i>for tenor, horn and strings, was an especially fecund one for Britten. Having returned to Britain from America, he had given various wartime recitals and in the autumn received a commission to write a piece for men&rsquo;s voices and piano. With a dedication to &lsquo;Richard Wood and the musicians of Oflag VIIb&rsquo; (a prisoner-of-war camp in Bavaria) <i>The Ballad of Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard </i>is an anonymous tale of adultery, betrayal and regret. It had immediate appeal to the incarcerated officers and is so beautifully set that it is almost like a miniature choral opera. Over an initial tolling bell accompaniment it tells of the seduction of Lady Barnard by Musgrave after Matins where &lsquo;he had more mind of the fair women than he had of our Lady&rsquo;s Grace!&rsquo; An eavesdropping page informs Lord Barnard of the liaison and, with much galloping from Lord Barnard&rsquo;s steed, a duel inevitably ensues and ends with the death of both lovers. This little masterpiece demonstrates Britten&rsquo;s superb ability to match words with high quality music at the appropriate skill level for amateur performers which was to hold him in good stead with many of his later works. Its first performance took place in February 1944 during part of a month-long camp music festival with Lieutenant Richard Wood conducting about thirty men.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><b><i>The Tiffany Anthem &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</i></b><i>David Fisher</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by the ladies of Kingfisher Chorale &amp; Simon Headley&nbsp;directed by David Fisher)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">This anthem was commissioned by Jonathan Gregory [former Director of Music at Leicester Cathedral and Deputy Head Chorister when I joined the choir] and the Leicester Old Choristers&rsquo; Association with help of a grant from the Arts Council England and first performed in Leicester Cathedral on Saturday 18th September 2004 by the Cathedral Girls&rsquo; Choirs of Coventry, Derby &amp; Leicester on the occasion of the 74th Festival of The Federation of Cathedral Old Choristers&rsquo; Associations. The anthem was subsequently performed at St Paul&rsquo;s Cathedral, London in May 2007 and was also performed to the Archbishop of Canterbury in June 2009. Peter Gould [Master of the Music], Tom Corfield [Organist] and the Girl Choristers of Derby Cathedral Choir released the world premi&egrave;re recording of the anthem in 2009. I didn&rsquo;t know at the time that a former chorister and prot&eacute;g&eacute; of Peter Gould and Tom Corfield would, only a few years later be conducting the first performance of my new work as a Director of Cathedral Music in his own right. The words of the anthem can be found on the chapel designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany for the 1893 World&rsquo;s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. It is an amazing interior which has all the words set in the mosaics around the chapel. The inspiration for me, when I knew I was writing for young voices, was the line on one of the steps of the chapel: &ldquo;I will go to the altar of God, to God who gave joy to my youth.&rdquo; I set the anthem with English and Latin texts alternating and overlapping. The piece is in ternary form with an introduction and coda and the accompaniment is designed to test the organ in terms of virtuosity and its timbres.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">One of the best choirs I have ever sung in was the Leicester City Schools&rsquo; Madrigal Group which consisted of the top eight singers from The Teachers&rsquo; Choir and eight hand-picked students from city schools. Directed by D G Davies [pictured above - a gifted Welsh conductor with an ear for the fluency and style of the music we performed and whose son sang in Leicester Cathedral Choir in the 60s] we performed an amazing array of music from many centuries and the next three pieces sing by Kingfisher Chorale are a small selection. Our first concerts were in and around Krefeld, Leicester&rsquo;s twin city and we sang to packed audiences and gained critical acclaim. It was singing in this choir that I met two of the musicians who were to have a profound effect on my musical development: Bill Snape &amp; Peter Farrands.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>Now is the gentle season&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i>Thomas Morley </i>[1557-1602]</p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by members of Kingfisher Chorale)<!--[endif]--></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">A lovely secular four-part madrigal by Thomas Morley in two halves. The first to the words: &ldquo;Now is the gentle season freshly flow&acute;ring, to sing and play and dance while May endureth, &amp; woo and wed too, that sweet delight procureth&rdquo; The second, imitative, section begins with the words &ldquo;The fields abroad&rdquo;. This was also a popular madrigal at Alderman Newton&rsquo;s Boys&rsquo; School alongside masterpieces like Gibbons&rsquo; <i>The Silver Swan</i> and Weelkes&rsquo; <i>As Vesta was from Latmos hill descending</i> which matched the great English Renaissance pieces learned at the cathedral.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>The Cloud-capp&rsquo;d Towers &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i>Vaughan Williams </i>[1872-1958]</p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Kingfisher Chorale&nbsp;directed by Giles Turner)<!--[endif]--></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">This is the middle setting of Vaughan Williams&rsquo; <i>Three Shakespeare Songs, </i>dating from 1951 and written for a choral competition connected with the Festival of Britain. The elderly composer creates a hypnotic atmosphere with a succession of tonally conflicting chords which, when combined with dramatic changes of dynamics, produce an effect of light and shade of dazzling assurance and sensitivity. Shakespeare&rsquo;s powerful lines [a setting of Prospero&rsquo;s great speech from Act IV of <i>The Tempest</i>] are transformed into a musical dream &ndash; one of the most impressive of Vaughan Williams&rsquo; choral output.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>The Turtle Dove &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</i></b><i>Vaughan Williams</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Darron Moore &amp; Kingfisher Chorale&nbsp;directed by Giles Turner)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">Sometimes known as Ten Thousand Miles, this folk song was collected in 1904 by Vaughan Williams who recorded the singing of Mr. Pendfold, landlord of the &ldquo;Plough Inn&rdquo;, Rusper, Sussex on a wax cylinder. The present arrangement was made in 1924 and features a solo voice in the first and last verses, some stunning textural writing in verse two and the soloist joins the choir in verse three. The Turtle Dove is a traditional symbol of constancy and faithfulness and, whilst mentioned several times in the Bible, is most popularly sung about in <i>The Twelve Days of Christmas</i>.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>Two Songs for Children&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i>David Fisher</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Darron Moore&nbsp;with David Fisher - piano)</p> <p class="MsoNormal">4. &lsquo;Do you know?&rsquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">5. &lsquo;Warning to Children&rsquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>The Angel Aria &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</i></b><i>David Fisher</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Emma Trounson, Kingfisher Chorale &amp; Simon Headley&nbsp;directed by Giles Turner)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><i>Laudate Dominum</i> was written and performed in 1996 as a commission for Dame Emma Kirkby, Derby Choral Union and an authentic Classical orchestra. Later in 1999, it was performed by the Leicester Bach Choir with Alison Smart in a new accompaniment for organ. Leicester Bach Choir, again conducted by Giles Turner, performed the entire work at that time in 2002 as part of the Leicestershire Composer&rsquo;s concert accompanied by a modern orchestra (with soprano Kate Tansy) rather than for the authentic Classical orchestra for which it is written. The universality of the text &ldquo;O praise the Lord all ye people&rdquo; is emphasised by the use of four languages: Latin, German, English and French. It is in ternary form with an introduction and coda. The first section closes with the whole choir singing the fanfare figure before the soprano soloist begins the French text in a slow and lyrical melody in C major accompanied by pulsating strings, oboe solo and flutes. This anthem version of the &quot;Angel Aria&quot; was first performed at the memorial service for the composer&acute;s mother in 2001. The English translation is: &ldquo;O praise the Lord all ye nations: praise him all ye people. For his merciful kindness is great toward us: and the truth of the Lord endureth for ever.&rdquo; [Psalm 117]</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wRiVVCPVN4o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>The Christ-child </i></b><b>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</b><i>David Fisher</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by the ladies of Kingfisher Chorale &amp; David Fisher - piano -&nbsp;directed by Giles Turner)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">Written specifically for Dame Emma Kirkby and Herr Joachim Diessner von Isensee, this carol was performed at the Evangelische Vers&ouml;hnungskirche, Ehrenfeld,&nbsp;K&ouml;ln on December 16th 2012 by the dedicatees. Tonight&rsquo;s performance is the British premi&egrave;re and the first to be performed by a choir rather than soloists. The words are taken from &quot;A Christmas Carol,&quot; by G.K. Chesterton [1874-1936], was first published in &quot;The Wild Knight&quot; in 1900. The first three verses are set independently and in different keys although the home tonality returns in the last verse. The opening vocal figuration represents the fluttering of angels&rsquo; wings.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>Pie Jesu &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</i></b><i>David Fisher</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Kingfisher Chorale &amp; Simon Headley&nbsp;directed by Giles Turner)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">The premi&egrave;re performance of <i>Requiem</i> was at Holy Cross Church Daventry by the Daventry Choral Society conducted by Giles Turner [the longest serving and youngest Head Chorister under Peter White] on 31st March 2001 with the organist Tom Corfield [who taught Chris Johns]. Derby Choral Union also performed the <i>Requiem</i> at Derby Cathedral on 16th November 2002. It is not a standard setting of the Requiem Mass in that it comments on the journey towards death and the effect of death upon those left behind. &ldquo;Pie Jesu&rdquo; is movement 6 and is a calm setting of the famous words. Described in Neil Crutchley&rsquo;s review as showing &ldquo;the composers natural gift for melody&rdquo;.&nbsp; Here the rise and fall of the opening melody is contrasted with the peaceful hymn-like section of the central section.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/oBGiVFbu6oU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>Litany to the Holy Spirit &nbsp;&nbsp;</i></b><i>Christopher Johns</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Leicester Cathedral Choir &amp; Simon Headley directed by Chris Johns)</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Dedicated to &ldquo;the very Reverend David Monteith on the occasion of his installation as Dean of Leicester. Eve of Pentecost, 18 May 2013.&rdquo; The melodic and harmonic structure of this piece is based on a complex code derived the words &lsquo;David Monteith&rsquo;. In a short extract from Dr Johns&rsquo; explanation at the beginning of the score he rationalises the basic concept thus: &ldquo;The German system of note names uses the letters A to H for the for the seven &lsquo;white notes&rsquo; pitches plus our B-flat and the letters I to L were assigned to the remaining four &lsquo;black note&rsquo; pitches. The next twelve letters of the alphabet were interpreted in the same way&rdquo;.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><!--[if !mso]> v:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 230 1314 Kingfisher Chorale 10 3 1541 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} table.MsoTableGrid {mso-style-name:"Table Gridmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-priority:59; mso-style-unhide:no; border:solid windowtext 1.0pt; mso-border-alt:solid windowtext .5pt; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-border-insideh:.5pt solid windowtext; mso-border-insidev:.5pt solid windowtext; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&ldquo;Translated in this way, &lsquo;David Monteith, Dean of Leicester&rsquo; gives the following sequence of notes and the melody for each line of the first and second verses and all but the third line of the fourth verse is made up of contiguous strings of notes taken from this sequence, as follows&rdquo;:</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Without getting too involved in this ingenious method of construction, the work is very striking with wonderful textural contrasts and an exquisite final cadence.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/0DaM7rU-Hig" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>O thou, the central orb &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</i></b><i>Charles Wood </i>[1866-1926]</p> <p class="MsoNormal">(performed by Leicester Cathedral Choir, Simon Headley, Songmen Emeriti, Old Choristers &amp; Kingfisher Chorale&nbsp;directed by Chris Johns)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Irish-born Charles Wood became one of the inaugural group of fifty students at the newly-instituted RCM. There Wood studied with Stanford and Parry and later became a teacher of note himself including both Vaughan Williams and Herbert Howells amongst his pupils. <i>O Thou, the central orb</i>,<i> </i>published in 1915 is an exuberant setting of a text by Henry Ramsden Bramley. It is wonderful anthem in which the paean&rsquo;s reverential setting of the words builds to a mighty conclusion of real splendour. Apart from the fact that this piece shows the direct legacy from Stanford and Parry to Vaughan Williams and Howells (which is the basis of this evening&rsquo;s celebration), it is included because when I was due to retire as a chorister Peter White asked if I&rsquo;d like to choose an anthem. I selected this powerful piece so that I could sing that top A-flat and finish my treble career in a blaze of glory. Those are the memories that last a lifetime and some 44 years later I still remember that choral evensong with great fondness.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/-23mqNuSbU4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p><b>The Leicester Cathedral Legacy Concert would not have been possible but for these people who over the years have given me the skills and/encouragement for my life in music:</b></p> <!--[if !mso]> v:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} o:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} w:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);} .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);} <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 475 2709 Kingfisher Chorale 22 6 3178 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>George Gray</b> was vital in my development and has been mentioned several time in this programme already. He taught me four-part harmony and as a young teenager I revelled in the exploration and study of Bach chorales. I composed several works at the time. When Dr Gray retired from the cathedral I wrote a huge &quot;Gloria&quot; for him in up to eight parts&nbsp;with organ accompaniment. After that I wrote an <i>a cappella</i> anthem [<b><i>O praise the Lord</i></b>] for <b>Bob Prime</b>, who was the Assistant Organist at the time, to mark his move to the Lake District. Bob [or Mr Prime to me!] always showed an interest in the work I was doing and often gave valuable advice on structure. <b>Peter White</b>, who followed George Gray as Master of Music, was also my teacher at Alderman Newton&rsquo;s Boys&rsquo; Grammar School, and he refined my skills. He was a perfectionist in harmonic construction and his precision and brilliance in explaining unusual modulations stay with me now. Possibly the earnest believer in me since the early years, however, is my brother <b>Morris</b> who is a gifted musician. He is a professional conductor, singer and arranger and his active encouragement of my pieces right from when we were both adolescents has been of enormous benefit to me. I continue to be extremely grateful for his support. knowledge and experience and for his unerring sense of constructive criticism. My sister, <b>Elizabeth</b>, whilst a good choir mezzo herself was an arts management supremo and it was she alone who gained the funding for composition of my <b><i>Requiem</i></b> which, to date, is still my largest work. I am also fortunate to be married to <b>Pauline</b>, the most patient woman on the planet, who not only inspires my compositions but has written superb lyrics for the three Farnham commissions and as a result has been commissioned herself to write lyrics for four more Farnham pieces, two of which were composed by inspirational <b>Will Todd</b>.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">I should also point out that had <b>Miss Joyce Moon</b> (an amazing teacher who spotted and developed my singing talent at primary school) and <b>Mr David Shaw</b> (whose wonderful musicianship and enthusiastic brilliance at my grammar school encouraged a wider love of music) not been so good in their vocations I might not even have been in the profession long enough to write this paragraph! Much the same applies to <b>Bill Snape</b>&nbsp;[Leicester City Schools&rsquo; Madrigal Group] and <b>Roy Sawbridge</b> [long-serving ex-cathedral chorister and songman]. These introduced me to a far wider knowledge of musical genres and each, as gifted teachers and performers in their own rights, have given me advice which has developed my musical and educational skills. <b>Neil Crutchley</b> is justifiably well-known to people involved in almost every genre of the Arts in Leicester. A noted author and public speaker with an encyclop&aelig;dic knowledge of all music, especially choral music, it has been his perceptive and incisive critical comments over the years which have helped not only me but many musicians in similar professional backgrounds.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph">The Leicester Mercury previewed the event under the heading &quot;<strong>Cathedral choir has left a lasting legacy</strong>&quot; and this text:</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><strong>Composer, conductor and retired music teacher&nbsp;David Fisher has sent me this photo of Leicester Cathedral Choir, taken on Easter Day in 1966... at 5.13pm!</strong></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><strong>Mr. Fisher, who appears fourth from the right on the front row, tells me he is trying to track down all the names of the choir members.</strong></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><strong>In the photo, behind Mr. Fisher is George Gray the organist and master of the choristers from 1931 to 1969.&nbsp;</strong></em><em><strong>To Dr Gray&acute;s left is Jonathan Gregory, Leicester Cathedral&acute;s Director of Music&nbsp;from 1994 to 2010.&nbsp;</strong></em><em><strong>Another notable is Michael White, back row, third from right, who was Mr. Fisher&acute;s first head of music at New Parks Boys&acute; School.&nbsp;</strong></em><em><strong>If you love English choral music, then you might be interested in the Leicester Cathedral Legacy Concert, at 7.30pm on Saturday.</strong></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><strong>&quot;It will be a celebration of the vast legacy created by musical training in places such as Leicester Cathedral,&quot; says Mr. Fisher. &quot;In a concert which covers a wide variety of the most popular choral music, all the choirs of Leicester Cathedral, directed by Dr Chris Johns, will be joined by the Songmen Emeriti and old choristers of Leicester Cathedral, plus the Kingfisher Chorale, to celebrate the enduring effect singing in a cathedral choir can have on lives and careers.&quot;&nbsp;</strong></em><em><strong>Focusing on Mr. Fisher, the music will feature an anthem written when he was 14 and another composed especially for this concert. The latter, The Legacy, features all the choirs and is to be directed by Chris Johns and accompanied by Simon Headley.</strong></em><em><strong> <!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 237 1356 Kingfisher Chorale 11 3 1590 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--></strong></em><em><strong>&quot;This is a world premi&egrave;re of some significance and its theme mirrors the evening perfectly,&quot; says Mr Fisher.</strong></em></p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 10px; font-size: 13px; line-height: 1.38; font-family: open_sans, sans-serif;">The photo accompanying this article can be accessed by clicking <strong><a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/ahdzot8uxaxy68f/Leicester%20Cathedral%20Choir%201966.jpg?dl=0">HERE</a></strong>:</p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 10px; font-size: 13px; line-height: 1.38; font-family: open_sans, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 38 222 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 259 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>The following is part of an e-mail sent to the Leicester Mercury. The Leicester Mercury don&rsquo;t do reviews anymore but printed the letter [in a heavily edited version] on 26th October 2013. It is reproduced here under the heading given by the editor:&nbsp;</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>FIRST-RATE MUSICIANS WILL CREATE A LASTING LEGACY</strong></p> <p><strong> <!--EndFragment--></strong><em><b>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;My family and I were privileged to be at the&nbsp;Leicester Cathedral&nbsp;Legacy Concert&nbsp;and we were rewarded by a concert of exceptional quality.&nbsp;</b></em></p> <p><em><b>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Produced and mainly directed by David Fisher and Leicester Cathedral&rsquo;s Director of Music, Dr Chris Johns, the choirs of Leicester Cathedral, including their Songmen Emeriti and Old Choristers and the renowned Kingfisher Chorale were all brought together to celebrate the legacy of the musical training at the cathedral.</b></em></p> <p><em><b>&nbsp; &nbsp; Mr Fisher was a chorister during the 60&rsquo;s and founder of Kingfisher Chorale and he felt that it was his time with the choir at Leicester Cathedral that gave him the musical skills that dominated his artistic career.</b></em></p> <p class="ecxMsoNormal" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; "><em><b>&nbsp; &nbsp; We were treated to a wonderful selection of choral and organ pieces. There were many highlights, but those that stood out were pieces by Bainton, Bairstow and Wood with Mr Fisher&rsquo;s and Dr Johns&acute; not suffering in comparison.</b></em></p> <p class="ecxMsoNormal" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; ">&nbsp;</p> <p class="ecxMsoNormal" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; "><em><b>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;There were superb solo contributions from baritone Darron Moore.</b></em></p> <p class="ecxMsoNormal" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; ">&nbsp;</p> <p class="ecxMsoNormal" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; "><em><b>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;The climax of the evening, though, was the premi&egrave;re of&nbsp;The&nbsp;Legacy, &nbsp;written by Mr Fisher. Featuring all the performers, the work demonstrated choral singing at its best and proves that Leicester truly has first-rate musicians who will indeed create a lasting legacy.</b></em></p> <p class="ecxMsoNormal" style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; "><em>&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</em>&nbsp;</p> <!--EndFragment--> GMT http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=58 David Fisher LEICESTERSHIRE COMPOSERS CONCERT 2002 - David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=62 <!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 2603 14840 Kingfisher Chorale 123 34 17409 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Cambria;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none"><b>IMAGES ON THE RIGHT:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none"><b>1a &amp; b:</b> Front cover and title page of the programme</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none"><b>2.</b> David Fisher acknowledging the applause with Giles Turner</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none"><b>3.</b> L to R: Peter Crump, David Fisher, Terry Dwyer, Andrew Carter</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none"><b>4:</b> Rehearsal photo taken from the cathedral&rsquo;s choir gallery</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none"><b>5.</b> David Fisher chatting to Terry Dwyer during rehearsals</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none"><b>6.</b> L to R: Peter Crump, David Fisher, John Florance, Terry Dwyer, Andrew Carter taken at the pre-performance discussion with the composers</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 79 456 Kingfisher Chorale 3 1 534 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Cambria;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none"><b>7:</b> David Fisher discussing some finer points in the score with conductor with Giles Turner</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b style="text-align: start;">INFORMATION FROM THE CONCERT PROGRAMME:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">Welcome to tonight&rsquo;s very special concert at <b>Leicester Cathedral</b>.&nbsp;We are delight to present works by contemporary composers from Leicestershire who have established national and international reputations.&nbsp; The biographical notes which the composers have given us show that they have connections with each other and also, in most cases have been influenced by<b> Dr George Gray</b>, late Master of Music at Leicester Cathedral and conductor of the <b>Leicester Bach Choir</b> from 1931 to 1969.&nbsp; They can claim an impressive musical heritage: Dr Gray was very proud of the fact that he was taught by <b>Sir Edward Bairstow</b>, who was taught by <b>Frederick Bridge</b>, who was taught by <b>John Goss</b>, who was taught by <b>Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart</b>!</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">The Leicester Bach Choir has fostered performances of new music throughout its seventy-four year history.&nbsp; We are glad to be able to continue that tradition tonight, and to include in our programme work specially composed for the choir this year.&nbsp; This evening&rsquo;s music will demonstrate the breadth of composing styles in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.&nbsp; This will be a new and exciting experience for audience and performers alike.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>PETER CRUMP</b> (1928-2009<b>*</b>)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>*</b>&nbsp;<b><i>this concert was, of course, seven years before Peter Crump&rsquo;s death. Much missed by the musical world, further information may still be found on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/">www.composersalliance.com</a>.</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>Peter Crump</b> completed a degree at Oxford, and studied composition at the <b>Royal Academy of Music</b> (RAM).&nbsp; &ldquo;In 1967 I came to Leicestershire and taught at Ravenhurst Junior School, Braunstone; King Edward VII Upper School, Melton; and Fairfield School, Loughborough.&nbsp; The latter post I combined with private teaching and in 1976 I left to concentrate on private teaching as a <b>Suzuki</b> piano teacher.&nbsp; For many years I was Music Critic of the <b>Leicester Mercury</b>.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&ldquo;Simultaneously with all this, as a composer, many of my pieces have been performed and recorded.&nbsp; These include <b><i>Trio in B flat</i></b>, premiered by the <b>Oxford Trio</b> at a <b>New Walk Museum and Art Gallery</b> lunchtime concert.&nbsp; <b><i>Threnody</i></b> for cello and strings, composed in memory of my daughter Stella who was killed in a climbing accident, performed and recorded by the Kingfisher Chorale; <b><i>March of the Hare</i></b> for tuba quartet performed and recorded by <b>Tubalate</b>.&nbsp; Three years ago pieces of mine were performed at my 70th birthday concert in St James the Greater.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&ldquo;I am secretary of the Central Composers&rsquo; Alliance.&nbsp; Their own disc <b><i>Music for A While</i></b> was launched on 22nd November and includes my four settings of George Herbert and <b><i>Berceuse</i></b> for piano.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b><i>STABAT MATER</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>Peter Crump writes that he first started his version of <i>Stabat Mater</i> in 1995 and has worked on it ever since.&nbsp; Historically, the Stabat Mater, a 13th meditation on the sorrows of the Virgin Mary at the foot of the cross, has been set to music several times.&nbsp; &ldquo;My setting,&rdquo; says Crump, &ldquo;uses Baroque forms and old instruments like shawm and recorder.&nbsp; But it is not meant to be archaic.&rdquo;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>&ldquo;Forms in the arts do not belong per se to particular periods and once evolved into something recognisable are valid for all time.&nbsp; Nor need they remain static.&nbsp; My harmonic language is tonal and employs a development of that used by Baroque and Classical composers. Added notes and sometimes chords, are a feature sometimes producing the effect of polytonality.&nbsp; Forms used in <i>Stabat Mater</i> include Fugue and ground bass and for the last movement, Fac me plagis, a waltz.&nbsp; Anyone who thinks this is inappropriate should be reminded that Bach used dance forms for the last movements of both the St. John and St. Matthew Passions.&rdquo;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>ANDREW CARTER</b> (b. 1939)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">Andrew Carter&rsquo;s early years in and around Leicester were taken up with as much with ringing and singing.&nbsp; &ldquo;I grew up in a change-ringing family and new many of the towers in the area. Then as now the Leicestershire Diocesan Association of Ringers was at the forefront of the art. Hand bells were my first instrument and I was ringing Christmas and folk tunes four-in-hand with the family team before I can remember.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">The next step was the piano.&nbsp; &ldquo;The late <b>Helen Dalby</b> LRAM, ARCM of Oadby Lane taught me piano for a decade, often bemoaning my lack of practice.&nbsp; At <b>Kibworth Beauchamp Grammar School</b> a whole new world of music opened up the (still) dynamic <b>Terry Dwyer</b> burst on the scene as music master. He introduced a whole gang of us to <b>Hall&eacute;</b> concerts at De Montfort Hall (my first hearing of Beethoven&rsquo;s 5th Symphony) and put us through our paces in performance of Bach cantatas and Mozart operas when most other schools did G &amp; S if they were lucky. In choir to we did justice to a challenging repertoire, and I sang successively soprano, alto, tenor and bass as my treble voice gradually sank to the bottom. Terry gave us a rigorous but imaginative grounding in all things harmonic and melodic, and I still have my exercise books to prove it. In my case music was the only shining star amongst the dismal litany of my school reports. Though I improvised on the piano from an early age (which explains some of Helen Dalby&rsquo;s frustration!), my earliest surviving composition is a Prelude in C minor which won 1st prize in a school composition.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&nbsp;&ldquo;It was in Leicester Cathedral that I first heard the Bach Passions sung by Leicester Bach Choir under George Gray. My abiding love of English Cathedral music had its origins there too, for I often attended evensong in my mid-teens (again prompted by Dwyer) to hear such works as Stanford in C and George&rsquo;s wonderful accompaniments on the Harrison organ.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">In 1965 Andrew Carter founded the Chapter House Choir at York Minster. Many of his early carol and folk song arrangements were penned for his York choirs.&nbsp; Oxford University Press has published over 50 pieces, five of them larger scale commissions for choir, soloists and orchestra. <b><i>Benedicite</i></b> has been performed on both sides of the Atlantic. <b><i>Music&rsquo;s Jubilee and Horizons</i></b> were premi&egrave;red at Otley and St Neot&rsquo;s choral societies respectively, while the <b><i>Te Deum</i></b> and <b><i>Songs of Stillness</i></b> for American Lutheran and Quaker choirs.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b><i>BENEDICITE</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>&ldquo;<i>Benedicite</i>,&rdquo; says Carter &ldquo;is simply the Latin title &acute;All the world praise the Lord.&acute; &nbsp;The English Prayer Book takes thirty-three verses to say so; I chose few of the old verses and three new ones for the children, after an idea by Carol Woollcombe, to make eleven movements.&rdquo;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>TERENCE DWYER </b>(b1922)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">Born in Leicester, Terence was educated in Bromley, but moved back at age 18.&nbsp; After qualifying as a teacher, he studied organ under <b>George Gray</b> and composition under <b>Ben Burrows</b>.&nbsp; He has lived in Quorn for 38 years where he leads a varied and interesting life.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">His musical career began in Leicester by joining a small group of madrigal singers headed by Harold Dexter.&nbsp; &ldquo;Dexter inspired me greatly and introduced membership of both <b>Leicester Cathedral Choir</b> and <b>Bach Choir</b>.&nbsp; <b>Deryck Cooke</b> was in this group too, and he encouraged me to compose.&nbsp; <b>George Gray</b> was always an inspiration to anyone who met him.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">Terence Dwyer&rsquo;s first teaching post was at the <b>Moat Road Boys&rsquo; School</b> followed by <b>Kibworth Beauchamp Grammar School</b>.&nbsp; On leaving Kibworth he visited many Leicestershire Schools as Deputy Music Advisor. For over 50 years he played a prominent part in the musical life of Leicestershire, having conducted the <b>Leicester City String Orchestra</b>, <b>Leicestershire County String Orchestra</b>, <b>Leicester Chamber Orchestra</b>, <b>Hinckley Choral Society</b>, and <b>Oadby Choral Society</b> amongst others.&nbsp; Of all his achievements he says he is proudest of the progress of some of his former pupils, who have gone on to become musicians of outstanding merit.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">His compositions range from solo songs and chamber music to opera and symphony.&nbsp; His first orchestral piece <b><i>Bayeux Tapestry</i></b> (1958) is still performed by local orchestras. In recent years he has completed a violin concerto, a large orchestral suite, and an organ quintet and shows no sign of running out of musical ideas at the age of 79.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>&nbsp;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b><i>VISION</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>This work commissioned for this concert, opens and closes with the inspiration of a poem by Walt Whitman (1819-1892).&nbsp; &ldquo;What music? What storm?&rdquo; wondered Dwyer.&nbsp; For an answer, he turned to Heather Newby, who had written the libretto for his opera Boadicea.&nbsp; Newby kindly composed a new poem that becomes the haunting central text.</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>&ldquo;The two poets dovetail perfectly,&rdquo; says Dwyer. &ldquo;The theme of Heather&rsquo;s allegory whilst a little enigmatic, surely encapsulates the interdependence between the spiritual and the mundane.&nbsp; For me this symbolises perfectly that the beauty and magic of music would not exist without the hard practical work of composers and performers.&nbsp; Musicians need to feel and think, express and count the beats, to practise and let flow.&nbsp; Long may music give us joy.&rdquo;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>&ldquo;I compose in no particular style.&nbsp; Every composer is an amalgam of all the music he hears and admires, unless he makes a special effort to innovate.&nbsp; In Vision I responded to the words in a simple and direct manner, often following my instincts almost without thinking.&nbsp; There were some conscious decisions, however: to share the text between soloist and choir in a&nbsp;reasonable proportion; to vary the choral texture from a single line up to eight-part writing; to use dissonant, plain, or &lsquo;seductive&rsquo; harmony as appropriate; and to use orchestral colour to underline or illustrate the current mood.&nbsp; Thus you will hear drums for horse hooves, trumpets and cymbals where mentioned etc.&nbsp; The overall dramatic curve of work was planned, including making the musical style and texture gradually simpler as the work progresses.&nbsp; I end with a big happy tune, to compensate for the previous turmoil.&rdquo;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>DAVID FISHER </b>(b. 1952)</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">David Fisher considers Leicester his spiritual home, as most of his life has been shaped and influenced by two institutions here: <strong>Leicester Cathedral</strong> [from 1963] and <strong>Alderman Newton&rsquo;s Boys&rsquo; Grammar School</strong> [from 1964].</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&nbsp;&ldquo;Careers are often decided by a series of coincidences &ndash; is it fate? I had a good treble voice and sang at all the local festivals being trained by <strong>Miss Moon</strong> at <strong>Holmfield Primary Schoo</strong><strong>l</strong>, Leicester Forest East.&nbsp; She was a great teacher and developed a good choir and several excellent singers. The head teacher was <strong>Mr. Basford</strong> and his sons were in the cathedral choir.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">Due to his singing skills, he was recommended to <strong>George Gray</strong> and accepted for the choir although he was already 10 by that time. In his first year at the cathedral, having just transferred from going to a Leicestershire grammar school to <strong>Alderman Newton&rsquo;s Boys&rsquo; School</strong> with the support of the Cathedral, he was auditioned for and offered the part of Oliver in the musical&rsquo;s national tour. He turned it down because &ldquo;by this time I was settled educationally and musically.&rdquo;&nbsp; There were compensations.&nbsp; &ldquo;George spotted skills at a very early stage and he was the next great influence in my life &ndash; possibly the greatest musically. I had composition lessons with him (gratis) when he found the time between the 4.00 and 6.30 evensongs on occasional Sundays. The foundation of my knowledge of the choral repertoire and skill in harmony is due to him.&nbsp; He was a modest genius and many fell under his spell.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&ldquo;The next influence in my life was the music teacher at <strong>Alderman Newton&rsquo;s Boys&rsquo; School</strong>, <strong>David Shaw</strong>. He was an eccentric and exciting musician.&nbsp; His lessons were full of interest and his extra curricular work was brilliant. I was sorry when he left in the 11th Year but in the interregnum between his leaving and Peter White&rsquo;s arriving I ran the music with several other musicians.&nbsp; We gave concerts and shows and I conducted the choir and other groups too. My teaching and future conducting career came from this.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&ldquo;Thus my career was shaped by musicians from Leicester!&nbsp; I went to the <strong>College of the Venerable Bede</strong>, <strong>Durham University</strong> (an Anglican college) under the auspices of the Cathedral. I fell in love with a Leicester lady and on completing my qualification, married and move back to Leicester.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">Fisher has been a moving force in Leicester ever since. He is Head of Performing Arts at <strong>King Edward VII College</strong>, <strong>Coalville</strong>, was the Musical Director of the <strong>Derby Choral Union</strong> and founded the <strong>Kingfisher Chorale</strong>.&nbsp; He is Chairman of the Central Composers&rsquo; Alliance and a member of the British Academy of Composers and Songwriters.&nbsp; His commissions include a sixty minute <strong><em>Requiem</em></strong> (2001) for Daventry Choral Society and three large works for children for the prestigious&nbsp; Farnham Festival: <strong><em>Aspects of Time</em></strong>; <strong><em>All is Well</em></strong> and <strong><em>Let us build for ever</em></strong>.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b><i>LAUDATE DOMINUM </i></b><b>&amp;<i> ALLELUIA</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b><i>Laudate Dominum</i></b><b> was written in 1996 as a commission for Derby Choral Union and the internationally renowned soprano Dame Emma Kirkby with funds made available by East Midlands Arts.&nbsp; It was then performed by the Leicester Bach Choir with Alison Smart.&nbsp; Tonight&rsquo;s performance includes the world premi&egrave;re of the Alleluia movement in its organ version, written as part of Fisher&rsquo;s doctorate portfolio in composition at Sheffield University.</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>&ldquo;The universality of the text &lsquo;<i>O praise the Lord all ye people&rsquo;</i> is emphasised by the use of four languages: Latin, German, English and French. The Laudate Dominum is written in ternary form with n introduction and coda.&nbsp; At the end of the first movement, the choir alone sings three hushed &lsquo;alleluias&rsquo; before a drum sets the rhythm for the next movement.&nbsp; The voices grow from a unison note to a two-part chord, adding a progressive succession of parts until there is blazing eight-part climax in C major.&nbsp; This soon dies away and the solo soprano sings the central theme from Laudate Dominum as a valedictory &lsquo;alleluia&rsquo; before a final fanfare reflecting the conflicting E flat/C major tonalities which are pivotal to both movements.&rdquo;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>KATY TANSEY</b>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; soprano</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><i>Katy Tansey read music at Selwyn College, Cambridge and subsequently studied with David Pollard at the Guildhall School of Music &amp; Drama.&nbsp; Whilst there, she also won a scholarship to study Russian song at the Britten-Pears School with Galina Vishnevskaya with whom she subsequently studied privately.&nbsp; Katy sings regularly with John Eliot Gardiner&rsquo;s Monteverdi Choir and understudied the role of Marzelline (Leonore) in Jonathan Miller&rsquo;s acclaimed television production of Bach&rsquo;s St Matthew Passion and as Fiordiligi (Cosi fan Tutte) under Tadaaki Otaka at the Snape Proms.&nbsp;Recent concert appearances include Handel&rsquo;s Solomon with Northern Sinfonia, Mahler&rsquo;s Second Symphony (Guildhall Cathedral), Bach&rsquo;s St Matthew Passion (St John&rsquo;s Smith Square), Mozart&rsquo;s C Minor Mass (Birmingham Symphony Hall and Monteverdi&rsquo;s 1610 Vespers (Peterborough Cathedral).&nbsp; She also made her Purcell Room debut singing Handel and Vivaldi cantatas with Badinage and gave a song recital in the September Musical de l&rsquo;Orne Festival.&nbsp; She also covered the role of Tatyana (Eugene Onegin) for Grange Park Opera and completed a nationwide in the role for Pimlico Opera.&nbsp;Most recently, she has performed the role of Fiordiligi for Pimlico Opera&rsquo;s British tour of Cosi fan Tutte directed by Janis Kelly.&nbsp; Future engagements include concerts in Norwich Cathedral and a recital in the Purcell Room.</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>THOMAS GUTHRIE</b>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; baritone</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><i>Thomas Guthrie studied Classics at Cambridge before winning a scholarship to study at the RNCM, where he won prizes including the Fassbaender Award for Lieder, the Schubert Prize, and an ESU scholarship to study with Thomas Allen in Chicago.&nbsp; Roles include the title role in Don Giovanni and Count (Marriage of Figaro) for Jessie&rsquo;s Fund, Papageno (Magic Flute) for Opera Theatre Company, Denisov (War and Peace) at the 1999 Spoleto Festival, Mr. Jenks (The Tender Land) at the Barbican, and Sir Hugh Evans (Sir John in Love) all for Richard Hickox; Dromio of Ephesus (Comedy of Errors) for Bampton.</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>LEICESTER BACH CHOIR</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><i>The Leicester Bach Choir was founded in 1928 by Dr Gordon Slater, then Master of the Music at Leicester Cathedral, and was subsequently directed by his successors in that post, Dr George Gray (from 1931 to 1969) and Mr. Peter White (from 1969 to 1982).&nbsp; Later conductors were Clive Fairbairn, Malcolm Goldring, Paul Spicer, Robert Hollingsworth and Daniel Phillips; since 1998 the choir has been directed by Giles Turner.&nbsp; Their collective legacy has been an interest and expertise not only in performing the works of J S Bach but also in a wide range of British and European music ranging from the 15th to the 21st century. The choir has a current membership of approximately 50 singers, enabling it to perform both fairly large scale and more intimate works.&nbsp;</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><b>THE CHAMELON ARTS ORCHESTRA</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;text-align:justify;text-justify: inter-ideograph;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace: none"><i>The Chameleon Arts Orchestra was formed in 1987 by Chameleon Arts Management, to answer the need of Choral Societies nationwide for quality performance of the great works for choir and orchestra.&nbsp; From Monteverdi to Benjamin Britten, the orchestra performs in churches, cathedrals and concert halls throughout the country and can regularly be seen in concert at such venues as St John&rsquo;s, Smith Square, St Martin-in-the-Fields and Snape Maltings.</i><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 2592 14779 Kingfisher Chorale 123 34 17337 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:Cambria;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--><i>As the premier orchestra devoted to the performance of choral works, the ensemble boasts some of the country&rsquo;s finest freelance players whose other work includes the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, London Philharmonic Orchestra, The Royal Opera House Orchestra, the London Symphony Orchestra, The Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra and the English Chamber Orchestra.&nbsp;</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p> GMT http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=62 David Fisher A PERFORMANCE OF "THE TIFFANY ANTHEM" BY FOUR CATHEDRAL CHOIRS on 20th SEPTEMBER 2014 - David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=76 <p><strong style="color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">THE TIFFANY ANTHEM was commissioned by Jonathan Gregory and the Leicester Old Choristers Association with help of a grant from the Arts Council England and first performed in Leicester Cathedral on Saturday 18th September 2004 by the Cathedral Girls Choirs of Coventry, Derby &amp; Leicester on the occasion of the 74th Festival of The Federation of Cathedral Old Choristers Associations.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><strong>For the genesis of the piece and an explanation of its title please click <a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=817">HERE</a>.</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><strong>On the 10th anniversary of the piece,&nbsp;<em>The Tiffany Anthem</em>&nbsp;was chosen to be the anthem for the festival of girls&acute; choirs from four cathedrals [Derby, Coventry, Leicester and Southwell] at Derby Cathedral on 20th September 2014. Conducted by Dr Chris Johns from Leicester and featuring Dr Tom Corfield on the organ. The following Thursday [25th September] it was performed at Coventry Cathedral with Kerry Beaumont on the organ and then the girls from Leicester Cathedral performed it in their evensong on 29th September with Dr Johns directing and Simon Headley at the Harrison and Harrison organ for which the piece was written.</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><b>Canon Peter Gould [Master of the Music], Dr. Tom Corfield [Organist] and the Girl Choristers of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.boysoloist.com/album.asp?AlbumID=10619&amp;artistID=1273" style="padding: 0px; color: rgb(0, 83, 0); text-decoration: none;">Derby Cathedral Choir&nbsp;</a>released the definitive&nbsp;</b><b>recording of THE TIFFANY ANTHEM on&nbsp;<a href="http://www.regent-records.co.uk/" style="padding: 0px; color: rgb(0, 83, 0); text-decoration: none;">Regent Records&nbsp;</a>[REGCD333] in 2009.</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><strong>The photographs on the right are:</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><strong>[1] the four cathedral girls&acute; choirs of Derby, Coventry, Leicester and Southwell rehearsing at Derby Cathedral;</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><strong>[2] is the composer [C] with Canon Peter Gould [R] and Dr. Tom Corfield [L] with the girls from Derby Cathedral some of whom recorded the piece in 2009;</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><strong>[3] is Dr Chris Johns from Leicester conducting the anthem in rehearsal;</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><strong>[4] the music lists of Derby, Coventry and Leicester;</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><strong>[5] Coventry Cathedral Girls&acute; Choir conducted by Paul Leddington-Wright;</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><strong>[6a &amp; 6b] the Coventry girls&acute; choir with the composer and their Director of Music, Kerry Beaumont.</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><b>David Fisher writes:&nbsp;</b><em><b>I set the words which can be found on the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.morsemuseum.org/louis-comfort-tiffany/tiffany-chapel" style="padding: 0px; color: rgb(0, 83, 0); text-decoration: none;">chapel</a>&nbsp;designed by&nbsp;<a href="http://www.morsemuseum.org/louis-comfort-tiffany" style="padding: 0px; color: rgb(0, 83, 0); text-decoration: none;">Louis Comfort Tiffany</a>&nbsp;for the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.chicagohs.org/history/expo.html" style="padding: 0px; color: rgb(0, 83, 0); text-decoration: none;">1893 World&acute;s Columbian Exposition</a>&nbsp;in Chicago. It is an amazing interior which has all the words set in the mosaics around the chapel. The inspiration for me, when I knew I was writing for young voices, was the line on one of the steps of the chapel: I will go to the altar of God, to God who gave joy to my youth. I set the anthem&nbsp;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macaronic_language" style="padding: 0px; color: rgb(0, 83, 0); text-decoration: none;">macaronically</a>&nbsp;[English and Latin texts alternating and overlapping] with a stirring tune and all the harmonies are designed to be melodies in their own right for ease of singing. The piece is in ternary form with an introduction and coda and the accompaniment is designed to test the organ in terms of virtuosity and its timbres. The huge volume of the opening with four notes being played at once on the pedals is matched</b><b>&nbsp;</b><b>by the sheer volume of &acute;<i>organo pleno&acute;</i>&nbsp;at the end in which the tuba [a noted stop of the&nbsp;<a href="http://leicestercathedral.org/about-us/explore-the-cathedral/the-organs-of-leicester-cathedral/" style="padding: 0px; color: rgb(0, 83, 0); text-decoration: none;">Leicester</a>&nbsp;</b><b><a href="http://leicestercathedral.org/about-us/explore-the-cathedral/the-organs-of-leicester-cathedral/" style="padding: 0px; color: rgb(0, 83, 0); text-decoration: none;">organ</a>]</b><b>&nbsp;</b><b>comes to the fore.</b></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><strong>For further information, here is an excellent video of the Tiffany Collection at the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art in which you can get some idea of the detail and magnificence of the collection and the Tiffany Chapel:</strong>&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kM3eitmOfww" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><strong>The words taken from the <a href="http://www.morsemuseum.org/louis-comfort-tiffany/tiffany-chapel">Tiffany Chapel</a> are:</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b><i>I will go to the altar of God, to God who gave joy to my youth</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>SANCTUS SANCTUS SANCTUS</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>DOMINUS DEUS OMNIPOTENS</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>QUI ERAT ET QUI EST ET QUI VENTURUS EST</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>ERGO SUM PANIS VIVUS QUI DE COELO DESCENDI</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b><i>I am the bread of life descended from Heaven</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>SI QUIS MANDUCAVERIT EX HOC PANE VIVET IN AETERNUM</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b><i>Who eats this bread will live eternally</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>SANCTUS SANCTUS SANCTUS</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>DOMINUS DEUS OMNIPOTENS</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>QUI ERAT ET QUI EST ET QUI VENTURUS EST</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>ADJUTORIUM NOSTRUM IN NOMINE DOMINI QUI FECIT CAELUM ET TERRAM</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b><i>Our help is in the Name of the Lord who made heaven and earth</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>SANCTUS SANCTUS SANCTUS</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>DOMINUS DEUS OMNIPOTENS</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>QUI ERAT ET QUI EST ET QUI VENTURUS EST</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b><i>I will go to the altar of God, to God who gave joy to my youth</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>SANCTUS SANCTUS SANCTUS</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>DOMINUS DEUS OMNIPOTENS</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>QUI ERAT ET QUI EST ET QUI VENTURUS EST</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><b>SANCTUS!</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px;"><strong>Below is the live video recording of the performance in&nbsp;Derby Cathedral on 20th September 2014 and underneath the video are some of the critical comments received since the video was published on YouTube:</strong><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/CABov200Psg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph; mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><b>&ldquo;The performance at Derby Cathedral of &ldquo;The Tiffany Anthem&rdquo; is very impressive and Tom Corfield&rsquo;s playing is terrific. I&rsquo;ll give some thought to a boys&rsquo; choir who could tackle it&hellip;&rdquo;</b> [<b><i>R</i></b><i>.<b>S</b>. Surrey, England</i>]</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:justify;text-justify:inter-ideograph; mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none;text-autospace:none"><b>&ldquo;What a beautiful setting &ldquo;The Tiffany Anthem&rdquo; is, and great sound, with the girls singing, the ironwork and stained glass, the organ, and the overarching blend of sound.&nbsp;It is really a very good piece, even to uninformed ears like mine.&nbsp;You have achieved what you stated as your goal; to really use all of the voices of the organ, to fill the sanctuary with sound, and to blend high and low with soft and strong notes and chords. From watching the organist, it appears to be a blend of contrasting rhythms too...making it surely difficult to play.&rdquo;</b> [<b><i>G</i></b><i>.<b>F</b>. Mesa, Arizona, USA</i>]&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none"><b>&ldquo;I listened to the YouTube session of &ldquo;The Tiffany Anthem&rdquo; on the computer and then streamed it over the Internet on my TV with the sound coming through the BOSE amplifier.&nbsp;What a performance in a fine acoustic! Dr. Tom never ceases to amaze me.&nbsp; He just sits there and plays superbly without any fuss and showy movements&hellip;&rdquo; </b>[<b><i>D</i></b><i>.<b>S</b>. Leicestershire, England</i>]</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none"><b>&ldquo;I am so delighted the anthem is so well received... I think it absolutely beautiful&hellip;&rdquo; </b>[<b><i>G.B</i></b><i>. East Sussex, England</i>]</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none"><b>&ldquo;&hellip;new pieces present such technical and musical challenges. Having undertaken to perform it I&acute;m sure the choir members relished the opportunity to be involved in such an exciting and substantial work&nbsp;full of&nbsp;rhythmic and harmonic interest and memorable melodic lines.&rdquo; </b>[<b><i>R.R</i></b><i>. West Midlands, England</i>]</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; padding: 0px; color: rgb(13, 36, 51); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: justify;"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 281 1606 Kingfisher Chorale 13 3 1884 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>&ldquo;&hellip;even more special is the Derby Cathedral video.&nbsp; The audio and visuals are marvellous, and the organist and singers really shine, not to mention the conductor.&nbsp; The choristers must have been very proud of themselves afterwards. I could listen to them again and again.&nbsp;Congratulations to all involved...&rdquo; </b>[<b><i>R.V</i></b><i>. Warren, Michigan, USA</i>]</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 35 204 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 238 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none; text-autospace:none">&quot;<strong>I thought &ldquo;The Tiffany Anthem&rdquo; sounded splendid and Chris Johns really had the measure of it. I love the feeling of flashes of light that you manage to create in the music. It&acute;s a terrific festival piece!</strong>&quot; [<strong><em>N</em></strong><em>.<strong>C</strong>. Leicestershire, England</em>]</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align:none; text-autospace:none"><strong>&quot;The Tiffany Anthem is wonderful - very nicely produced video as well... I&acute;d have to describe those Fisher-esque harmonies as &acute;scrunchy&acute;...&quot;&nbsp;</strong>[<em><b>H</b>.<b>A</b>. Adelaide, South Australia</em>]</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> GMT http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=76 David Fisher CCA Composers meet BBC Radio 3's ALAN DAVEY - David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=83 <p>Photos from the top:</p> <p><strong>1. BASCA&acute;s invitation</strong></p> <p><strong>2. Some of the composers in the PRS Boardroom</strong></p> <p><strong>3. David in conversation with Alan Davey and Naomi Belshaw [Classical Account Manager, PRS <em>for</em> MUSIC]</strong></p> <p><strong>4. Rosemary, Alan and David</strong></p> <p><strong>5. Rosemary, Stephen McNeff [Chairman of BASCA&acute;s Classical and Jazz Executive Committee] and David.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>6. Alan Davey in conversation wiith Nicola LeFanu</strong></p> <p><strong>7. Rosemary with Jeremy Evans [BBC Radio 3 Editor]</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>The question which I posited was:</strong></p> <!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 44 254 Kingfisher Chorale 2 1 297 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>How can BBC Radio 3 better serve the Composers&acute; Alliances all around the country (which form the backbone of professional and semi-professional composers in the nation) in creating a more transparent process to submitting works for broadcast? </b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>When I have deciphered my notes I&acute;ll add his answer here. In the meantime, Rosemary has added her own overview:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <!--EndFragment--> <p><em><strong>&quot;Courtesy of BASCA I attended a very interesting evening with Alan Davey CBE, newly appointed head of Radio 3 who presented his vision to a packed room of classical composers at the PRS offices in London this month. It seems Radio 3 is in safe hands with its new controller, who has the goal of Radio 3 becoming more widely understood, and being the best radio station in the world. NIcola LeFanu&rsquo;s interview gave us a chance to hear Alan&rsquo;s plans for a more curated approach, with room for more contemporary music, sound that is not compressed, and to become known for quality. The evening then opened up to questions, exploring how can composers receive a greater profile (rather than the prevailing tendency to feature soloists and conductors foremost) and possibilities of representing regional classical music, and even jazz more.&nbsp; It will make for an interesting journey to follow.&quot;&nbsp;</strong></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 47 271 Kingfisher Chorale 2 1 317 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">&nbsp;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 47 268 Kingfisher Chorale 2 1 314 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>A fuller report on this interesting and thought-provoking meeting at 2 Pancras Square, King&rsquo;s Cross, London, N1C 4AG&nbsp; [the new headquarters for both PRS and BASCA] will appear here in due course but in the meantime here is some information about the appointment of Alan Davey which is taken from the BBC website:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Arts Council England&acute;s chief executive Alan Davey took over as Controller of BBC Radio 3 in January 2015 after seven years at the helm of the arts funding body.</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">He described Radio 3 as &quot;one of our most important cultural institutions and a beacon of excellence&quot;. He takes over from Roger Wright, who has left Radio 3 after 15 years to become chief executive of Aldeburgh Music. Mr. Davey said: &quot;<i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal">It is an honour to be asked to lead this wonderful institution and to renew it for the digital age, helping new audiences to encounter the wonderful things serious music and culture can bring. I stumbled upon Radio 3 when I was a teenager, and it opened a door to an endlessly fascinating world of sound and thought that has nourished me ever since. I want everyone to have that chance and am proud to be able to make sure they will</i>.&quot;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">&acute;Formidable track record&acute;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Radio 3 has around 1.9 million listeners per week in the UK, but was recently overtaken in the ratings by digital radio station BBC 6 Music for the first time. Mr. Davey&acute;s predecessor was also director of the BBC Proms, but the jobs have now been split and another appointment will be made to run the Proms. Mr. Davey will oversee the BBC&acute;s six performing groups, which include the BBC Symphony Orchestra, the BBC Philharmonic and the BBC Singers. BBC director general Tony Hall said Radio 3 was &quot;<i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal">a true icon of classical music and cultural broadcasting in the UK. Alan Davey has a formidable track record in the arts and a depth of understanding only matched by his passion for classical music. His appointment marks a new chapter in the Radio 3 story - one that will extend and grow its rich history of excellence, innovation, and distinctiveness.</i>&quot;</p> <p><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 274 1563 Kingfisher Chorale 13 3 1834 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Before joining Arts Council England, Mr. Davey worked for the Department for Culture, Media and Sport and Department of Health.</p> GMT http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=83 David Fisher Composer’s Choice: PIANO 1 - May/June 2015 - David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=86 <p>&nbsp;<strong>PIANO 1 - MAY/JUNE 2015</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>CCA</b><strong>&nbsp;Composer&acute;s&nbsp;</strong><b>Piece:</b>&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=816">The Four Seasons</a>&nbsp;-&nbsp;<a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/index.cfm?composer=161">David Fisher</a></strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Web page reference:</b>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm?work=816">www.composersalliance.com/composers/work.cfm</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal">This suite for piano has been performed many times and won second prize in the Charnwood Arts Composers&rsquo; Competition. Originally written as part of an MMus portfolio the four movements are designed to test the skills of Grade V or VI pianists. The have to use the full extent of the keyboard, play melodies in each register and play extremes of dynamics &ndash; notably in &ldquo;Winter&rdquo; (which is laid out on four staves) in which the upper parts a graded from loud to very soft and the lower parts from soft to very loud. The recording on the page is from the CD recording by Julian Hellaby although the dedicatee&rsquo;s recording [it was written for N&ecirc;st Harris] will be added soon.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>The Other Piece:</b><strong>&nbsp;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonata_in_B_minor_(Liszt)">Piano Sonata in B minor</a>&nbsp;-&nbsp;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Liszt">Franz Liszt</a></strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>YouTube video with score:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VCHE-UPwBJA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>YouTube video with live performance:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/68EMzR3Ct78" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=></iframe></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Not being a pianist &ndash; except just for teaching and accompanying &ndash; I have always admired the techniques of the art and the extreme virtuosity and Liszt&rsquo;s&nbsp;<b><i>Sonata in B minor</i></b>&nbsp;has almost everything that demonstrates the use of a piano. This was an A level set work for some time and my job was to enthuse orchestral players in pianistic techniques. Fortunately, for my brass players in the Desford Brass Band, many of them already used to playing virtuoso pieces, they could appreciate the technical facility, the dexterity, the physical strength and the many, many hours of practice require to master this pinnacle of the piano repertoire. Analysing it was easy and they assimilated the loose sonata structure very well although they were more impressed with the story that Brahms was alleged to have fallen asleep whilst the composer was playing the work.</p> GMT http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=86 David Fisher SAINSBURY'S/BBC CHOIR OF THE YEAR COMPETITION 1998 - David Fisher http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=88 <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="text-align:center">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="text-align:center"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal">Sainsbury&rsquo;s Choir of the Year 1998</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="text-align:center"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">Mixed Voice Semi-final - Buxton Opera House, November 21st 1998</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="text-align:center"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">Kingfisher Chorale</b><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">, </b>Musical Director<b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"> David Fisher</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>Kingfisher Chorale</i></b><i>, formed by David Fisher in 1992, featured a talented group of friends from Leicestershire and beyond with the intention of performing a broad range of secular and sacred music. They were very flexible in their programming and developed a large repertoire which encompassed music from the 13th to 21st centuries. They performed in different styles at a great nymber of events including evensongs, weddings or invitation concerts. Kingfisher Chorale also entered the prestigious Sainsbury&rsquo;s Choir of the Year Competition on three occasions and, in 1998 alongside three hundred choirs, was the &ldquo;Choir of the Day&rdquo; at the Manchester heat. The choir subsequently won through to the national selection stage to get through to the finals weekend at Buxton Opera House. Their performance was broadcast on BBC 2. The choir recorded a CD of Christmas Music from the 16th century to the present day and this was released just before Christmas in 1999. In 2000 the choir, against stiff competition, won the distinction of again being &ldquo;Choir of the Day&rdquo; at the Royal Northern College of Music heat. Many of the choir members, who joined by invitation, were soloists in their own right. The Musical Director was <b>David Fisher</b> who was also Musical Director of the Derby Choral Union from 1992-2004.</i></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>The comments on the pieces perfomed by Kingfisher Chorale at the televised sem-final of the&nbsp;<b style="text-align: center;"><i>Sainsbury&rsquo;s Choir of the Year 1998</i></b><b style="text-align: center;"><i>&nbsp;</i></b>are below. In order to access the recordings, simply click on the titles of the four pieces. The recordings can then be downloaded from Dropbox for study purposes only and are not to be retransmitted in any form. The adjuducator&acute;s comments from the 2000 competition are added at the end of this feature.</strong></p> <!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 194 1108 Kingfisher Chorale 9 2 1300 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">The Adjudicators were:</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><a href="http://www.ralphallwood.com">Ralph Allwood</a>: &nbsp;</b>Precentor and Director of Music at Eton College</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabriel_Crouch">Gabriel Crouch</a>: &nbsp;</b>Ex-Westminster Abbey chorister, now a member of the King&rsquo;s Singers</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Digby">Susan Digby</a>: &nbsp;</b>Founder and Director of the Voices Foundation</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Halsey">Simon Halsey</a>: &nbsp;</b>Chorus Director of the CBSO Chorus, Artistic Director of the BBC National Chorus of Wales, Conductor of the City of Birmingham Touring Opera</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Morrison_(music_critic)">Richard Morrison</a>: &nbsp;</b>Arts Editor of The Times</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/auaqmii601x12rp/01%20Victoria_%20Ave%20Maria.mp3?dl=0"><b><i>AVE</i></b>&nbsp;<strong><em>MARIA</em></strong></a>&nbsp;&nbsp;by&nbsp;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom%C3%A1s_Luis_de_Victoria"><b>Tom&aacute;s Luis de Victoria</b></a><b>&nbsp;&nbsp;</b>(1548-1611)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><strong>This little gem was a favourite of the choir and it allowed the listeners at the semi-final&nbsp;to cleanse their aural pallettes after the final piece of the previous choir. Sung in Latin.</strong></em></p> <p><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Ralph Allwood: &nbsp;</b>I love your light, gentle phrasing. Occasionally quaver detail was lost in the texture. You need a bit more warmth in your quiet singing.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Gabriel Crouch: &nbsp;</b>Difficult piece for the acoustic, but you could have found more space in the sound. Don&rsquo;t compensate for the lack of &lsquo;cathedral&rsquo; acoustic by singing it quickly - be daring and pretend you are in a cathedral, otherwise a beautiful motet ends up sounding like a madrigal. The quick sections worked O.K., but you need to find a more magical, sombre quality and colour for slow sections. Experiment with less vibrato at opening?</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Susan Digby: &nbsp;&nbsp;</b>Intoning - more solid at opening - blend and balance could be better. Well paced and phrased. Tuning insecurities in the final cadence. Nice contrasts in lightness and solid &lsquo;Sancta Maria&rsquo;.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Simon Halsey: &nbsp;</b>Very nice sense of phrasing. Sopranos occasionally unblended. Some inaccuracies of A/T intonation - tiny details that could easily be tidied up. Well blended. Good dynamics.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Richard Morrison: &nbsp;&nbsp;</b>Well varied, fine contrasting<b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"> <i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal">f</i></b> in middle. Slight tuning problem in final couple of bars. Perhaps try for a more austere tone for a contrast in the repertoire?</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><strong><a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/udw7jly1mv1ljz9/02%20arr.%20Rutter_%20Dashing%20away%20with%20the%20smoothing%20iron.mp3?dl=0">DASHING&nbsp;AWAY WITH THE SMOOTHING IRON</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong></em>arr. <strong><a href="http://www.johnrutter.com">John Rutter</a> </strong>(b.1940)</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><strong>One of the pieces that we sang towards the end of our &lsquo;variety&rsquo; concerts. It is fast, superbly written with clever changes of key, and tests all parts of the choir.</strong></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Ralph Allwood: &nbsp;</b>A lovely nimble performance. Occasionally the chording was unclear in your quiet singing.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Gabriel Crouch: &nbsp;</b>Bright, lively, accomplished. Great words in upper voices with convincing character. Not so good amongst the chaps.... <i>Largamente cantabile</i> section needs to be warmer. Sounded a bit too measured.... by using more breath in the sound, and challenge yourselves to reach even softer <b><i>pp</i></b>s. Lower voices - E natural often flat.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Susan Digby: &nbsp;</b>I felt this was too fast. More fluid phrasing - diction could be clearer at times. Nice light textures. Perhaps you could be more responsive to the text - sounded a bit pedestrian in places. Not enough blend page 27. Nice simple and unaffected quality.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Simon Halsey: &nbsp;</b>S/A too staccato in this acoustic. Is it all so well-phrased that it&rsquo;s a little precious? Soprano blend, legato, warmth a problem. Not all chording accurate enough and moments that need warmth are underplayed. On the edge of maximum tempo.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Richard Morrison: &nbsp;</b>Fun, but try for a little more dynamic contrast. Fast notes tucked in neatly. Watch ends of phrases, too, they sometimes fall away. A little too fast perhaps?</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>&nbsp;</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i><a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/pr4x5ge2yfw7ewu/03%20Fisher_%20My%20choice%20is%20made.mp3?dl=0">MY CHOICE IS MADE</a>&nbsp;</i></b>&nbsp; by <strong><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/index.cfm?composer=161">David Fisher</a></strong> (b.1952)</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><strong>This wedding motet was written in 1997. The choir loved the piece and it remained a firm favourite with its strong melodies, unusual chording and dynamic contrasts.</strong></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Ralph Allwood: &nbsp;</b>A beautifully sensitive performance bringing out, I felt, a sense of resignation.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Gabriel Crouch: &nbsp;</b>Lovely warm passionate sound. Well written for this choir. Pitch sagged a whisker. Would be helped by &lsquo;brighter&rsquo; sounding sopranos.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Susan Digby: &nbsp;</b>Soprano blending. Could be even warmer in tone quality - more emotional and flexible. More &lsquo;marcato&rsquo; to create textural contrast. Some tuning insecurities bar 19&Otilde; Could have created more atmosphere by exploring colour and dynamic flexibility.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Simon Halsey: &nbsp;</b>Opening unison betrayed intonation problems. Sopranos (and now tenors) have blend problems. Work at diphthongs e.g. choice which is not the same around the group. In fact some work on vowels only in legato would help the entire programme. Interesting choice.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Richard Morrison: &nbsp;</b>Lush and pleasing singing of lush harmonies! Well sustained in middle section, excellent crescendo, and lovely final cadence.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>&nbsp;</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i><a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/17eqwrpgl4s7mc3/04%20Distler_%20Vorspruch.mp3?dl=0">VORSPRUCH</a></i></b>&nbsp; by <strong><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_Distler">Hugo Distler</a></strong> (1908-1942)</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><strong>A little-known composer in Britain, Distler was a composer who, having been persecuted by the Nazis, committed suicide. He left some brilliant choral works of which this, the first of his Op. 19 is typical - cross rhythms, harmonic felicities and a brilliant fanfare ending. Sung in German.</strong></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Ralph Allwood: &nbsp;</b>You displayed an excellent range of dynamics and articulation, bringing out the archaic but fresh sense of this setting.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Gabriel Crouch: &nbsp;</b>Very accomplished, but you didn&rsquo;t sell it. The piece has a madrigalian quality (short answering phrases etc.) which wasn&rsquo;t harnessed. Needs contrasts. Experiment with colour....</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Susan Digby: &nbsp;</b>Needed even more precision page 143. Some blend and balance problems. A very demanding piece. An effective performance. More warmth and roundness could be developed both in lighter a more solid passages.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Simon Halsey: &nbsp;</b>First two bars a major problem in the sopranos. German not good: closed vowels sufficiently evenly closed, Z not correct, final chord badly tuned (is flat), glottals on words starting with vowels not clean enough. It&rsquo;s too fast. You must work at legato and not pick out all the notes. There is not enough tone or variety of tone.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>Richard Morrison: &nbsp;</b>Antiphonal passages needed a little more crispness. A very clear and tuneful final melisma, though.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>&nbsp;</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">GENERAL COMMMENTS:</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 29 171 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 199 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Susan Digby: &nbsp;</b>Thank you for an enjoyable well-presented programme. Good choice of music.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Simon Halsey: &nbsp;</b>A distinguished choir.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Richard Morrison: &nbsp;</b>Appealing choice of music - well done!</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>The Sainsbury&acute;s/BBC Choir of the Year judges gave their honest opinions and Kingfisher Chorale did not, alas, progress to the final but we did ask four notable choir trainers and soloists for their opinions on the pieces. These, perhaps because there was more time to write comments, are just as illuminating:</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/auaqmii601x12rp/01%20Victoria_%20Ave%20Maria.mp3?dl=0"><b><i>AVE</i></b>&nbsp;<strong><em>MARIA</em></strong></a>&nbsp;by&nbsp;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom%C3%A1s_Luis_de_Victoria"><b>Tom&aacute;s Luis de Victoria</b></a><b>&nbsp;&nbsp;</b>(1548-1611)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">1: &nbsp;</b>A touch on the fast side, though I liked it. Ends of phrases seemed a bit clipped.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">2: &nbsp;</b>A fraction fast at the beginning and the echo effects were well managed.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">3: &nbsp;</b>Fine sound - wonderful ethereal singing.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">4: &nbsp;</b>I would have taken this half speed, but then I am used to a vast acoustic! Adapted to the conditions on offer it still seemed a little fast as the lines did not all come through clearly.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><strong><a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/udw7jly1mv1ljz9/02%20arr.%20Rutter_%20Dashing%20away%20with%20the%20smoothing%20iron.mp3?dl=0">DASHING&nbsp;AWAY WITH THE SMOOTHING IRON</a>&nbsp;</strong></em>arr.&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://www.johnrutter.com">John Rutter</a>&nbsp;</strong>(b.1940)</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">1: &nbsp;</b>Slick, fine interpretation. Blend of T &amp; B not happy pages 18-19.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">2: &nbsp;</b>Delicacy and precision were evident - the music tripped off the tongue especially the S &amp; A. Dynamics especially the <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">crescs</i> and <i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal">dims</i> beautifully managed.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">3: &nbsp;</b>All parts heard to perfection.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">4: &nbsp;</b>Diction was incredible at this speed - excellent and the sops were good.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i><a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/pr4x5ge2yfw7ewu/03%20Fisher_%20My%20choice%20is%20made.mp3?dl=0">MY CHOICE IS MADE</a>&nbsp;</i></b>&nbsp;by&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/index.cfm?composer=161">David Fisher</a></strong>&nbsp;(b.1952)</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">1: &nbsp;</b>Chording in the last four bars needs placing better. Soprano blend not as good here. Really good otherwise.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">2: &nbsp;</b>Tenors too prominent bars 7-8. Last two bars more bass needed. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style:normal">Crescs</i> and <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">dims </i>could have used to better effect. Hesitancy in the sops in 28.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">3: &nbsp;</b>Enjoyed this very much - tenor prominent in two places.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">4: &nbsp;</b>Sops had problems sustaining. The tenor A flat jarred. The dynamic range was particularly fine and the basses were superb on &ldquo;of gentle blood&rdquo; in the middle of the piece. Herbert Howells would have been proud of the last few bars - beautiful.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i><a href="https://www.dropbox.com/s/17eqwrpgl4s7mc3/04%20Distler_%20Vorspruch.mp3?dl=0">VORSPRUCH</a></i></b>&nbsp;by&nbsp;<strong><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_Distler">Hugo Distler</a></strong>&nbsp;(1908-1942)</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">1: &nbsp;</b>Liked it very much.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">2: &nbsp;</b>Didn&rsquo;t like this one though it was very well done.&nbsp; Ensemble bars 3-4 on 142 could have been better. Second time around the fanfare in last six bars could have been a bit more accented, though this was excellent, restrained rhythmic singing.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">3: &nbsp;</b>This piece was lovely though I didn&rsquo;t really enjoy it. Technically accomplished.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">4: &nbsp;</b>Interesting and quite successful finale to the programme. Sops were clear and better here. Good chording from the choir.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>GENERAL COMMENTS:</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>1: &nbsp;</b>Difficult to fault - superb singing. Not worth criticising as comments made will be subjective at this level.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>2: &nbsp;</b>Fresh, vibrant, young sound - terribly impressed &amp; better than many commercial CDs. Enjoyed singing immensely - tone of the choir was gorgeous and the diction was superb! I listened once, made comments as a judge would and then listened nine more times to be really sure of my comments. So bloody good at every tiny detail. The&nbsp; programme was excellent - broadest possible taste and quite international. Well balanced in periods and techniques. Was this too refined for the judges? Would be a perfect sound with better acoustics. Please can I keep the tape?</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>3: &nbsp;</b>Not excited by the programme though it was well balanced. In none of the pieces did the sopranos seem to be stretched - even if the blend didn&rsquo;t work on occasions. There was much energy and the diction was excellent - every word expressed to perfection.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b>4: &nbsp;</b>Overall this was very good. It is always a mistake to hear one&rsquo;s performances afterwards as they always encourage one to look for mistakes and ignore all that is good. That is confirmed by the quality of performance here. Blend from the ATB could not be bettered, though sops need just a bit more work on blend in the sustained pieces such as the Fisher. In the faster pieces like the Rutter they were very good.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="text-align:center"><strong>Sainsbury&rsquo;s Choir of the Year 2000</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="text-align:center"><strong>Adjudicator&rsquo;s Comments - Sunday 30th April 2000</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="text-align:center"><strong>Royal Northern College of Music,</strong><strong>&nbsp;Manchester</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="text-align:center">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 27 160 Kingfisher Chorale 1 1 186 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} <![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:12.0pt;mso-pagination:none;mso-layout-grid-align: none;text-autospace:none">On this occasion, Kingfisher Chorale was again awarded Choir of the Day at the Manchester heat of the competition but, to our disappointment, was not selected for the semi-final stage.&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b><i>The Adjudicators were:&nbsp;</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Susan Digby</b> &amp; <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Jeremy Patterson</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">&nbsp;</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">LET MY PRAYER COME UP</i></b>&nbsp; by <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Blow"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">John Blow</b> </a>(1649-1708)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Susan Digby:</b>&nbsp; A beautifully sustained opening (a brave start!) well blended and balanced. You achieve good line &ndash; perhaps you could intensify into the centre of phrases even more.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Jeremy Patterson:</b> &nbsp;A beautifully controlled sensitive opening. Lovely relaxed tone &amp; musical phrasing. Soprano line not blending quite as well as ATB.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">&nbsp;</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">MASS TO THE TRINITY: </b></em><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">&lsquo;Credo&rsquo;</b>&nbsp; by <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/index.cfm?composer=161">David Fisher</a></b> (b. 1952)</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Susan Digby:</b>&nbsp; A rich and robust start. Very slight blend weaknesses in sop line. A very powerful effect b.23 which was sustained well through the section. You explore good dynamic range. Again could be refined. Sound intonation. An excellent piece impressively delivered.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Jeremy Patterson:</b> &nbsp;An impressively secure and accurate performance. Your pitching is highly commendable and you brought out the dramatic changes in mood and dynamics. Very satisfying to the audience &amp;, I trust, to the composer.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">&nbsp;</i></b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">BOGOR&Oacute;DITSE DEVO</i></b>&nbsp; by <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Rachmaninoff"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal">Sergei Rachmaninoff</b> </a>(1873-1943)&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Susan Digby:</b>&nbsp; You could work on a more &lsquo;Russian&rsquo; change of colour. You paced and controlled this beautifully. A good tempo. Some intonation insecurity in alto b.13, but it settled well. A powerful crescendo to ff. Good &lsquo;present&rsquo; basses. You could whisper the final ppp even more in this acoustic.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Jeremy Patterson:</b> &nbsp;Great control of breathing over these long phrases. You are blessed with basses who can do justice to this. Your general timbre remained British rather than a darker Slav.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal">IN DULCI JUBILO &nbsp;</i></b>arr. <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal"><a href="http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/index.cfm?composer=187">Peter Crump</a></b> (1928-2009)</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Susan Digby:</b>&nbsp; A lovely arrangement full of challenges which were expertly met. Beautifully moulded with many exciting moments. Very well paced with tremendous impact.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Jeremy Patterson:</b> &nbsp;A lovely contrast with delicate and dance-like rhythmic impetus. I loved your bounced quavers and shape to the phrases. Excellent.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">GENERAL COMMENTS:</b></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Susan Digby:</b>&nbsp; Thankyou.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="text-align:center"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 342 1955 Kingfisher Chorale 16 4 2293 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <!--EndFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight:normal">Jeremy Patterson:</b> &nbsp;A well constructed programme that gave different styles and technical requirements. Highly proficient and rewarding.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><!--[if gte mso 9]> 0 0 1 288 1642 Kingfisher Chorale 13 3 1927 14.0 <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-GB JA X-NONE <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]> <![endif]--> <!--[if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normalmso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman<![endif]--> <!--StartFragment--> <br clear="all" style="mso-special-character:line-break;page-break-before:always" /> <!--EndFragment--></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> GMT http://www.composersalliance.com/composers/blog.cfm?blog=88